Lync Server – Interface Technical Training https://www.interfacett.com Wed, 21 Jun 2017 19:26:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Implementing the Lync Server 2010 Web Scheduler https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/implementing-lync-server-2010-web-scheduler/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/implementing-lync-server-2010-web-scheduler/#comments Thu, 26 Jul 2012 23:22:58 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=6325 Believe it or not, I'm not always on my computer. Sometimes I'm outside the office, or on another person's machine without access to Outlook. It's times like these where I'm glad I have the Lync Web Scheduler. The web scheduler eliminates the need for the full Outlook meeting add-in that is typically used to schedule … Continue reading Implementing the Lync Server 2010 Web Scheduler

The post Implementing the Lync Server 2010 Web Scheduler appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
Believe it or not, I'm not always on my computer. Sometimes I'm outside the office, or on another person's machine without access to Outlook. It's times like these where I'm glad I have the Lync Web Scheduler. The web scheduler eliminates the need for the full Outlook meeting add-in that is typically used to schedule Lync meetings. It's nice because I can do e-mail in a browser with OWA, and when it's time to schedule a meeting, I can head over to the web scheduler.

Deployment
In order to deploy the web scheduler, you'll need to download and install it on your front-end servers. That's easy for a standard edition deployment, but remember that for enterprise pools you'll need to install the bits on each front-end.

The installation is a simple wizard that deploys an ASP.NET web application to your servers. Once the installation is complete, the application will be reachable at the following locations:

  • https://[internal pool FQDN]/scheduler
  • https://[external pool FQDN]/scheduler

Notice that you're referencing the internal or external pool name for your front-end servers. This shouldn't be a second though internally, but for external access, this may require that you modify existing publishing rules on your TMG server (if you're using it for reverse proxy) with the pool namespace. You may also need to add that namespace to the external ssl certificate.

End-User Experience
After logging in, you can see that clicking the 'Create New Meeting' button gives you the ability to schedule your meeting with all of the options made available by Outlook.

Upon saving the meeting, you get the full details, along with the meeting url, dial-in conferencing numbers, and conference id. This makes it easy for the end-user to copy and paste this information into an e-mail.

Existing meetings can also be modified or deleted by accessing the "My Meetings" screen.

Configuring Meeting Notifications
The Lync web scheduler also has the ability to send meeting notifications via IIS. Simply configure the SMTP settings for both the internal and external sites on your front-end servers.

In this case, I have an Exchange 2010 server that I'll be using to deliver the notifications. I have a dedicated receive connector on the Exchange transport server that allows the Lync front-end servers to relay mail.

You can grab the bits from the Microsoft Download Center:
Microsoft Lync Server 2010 Web Scheduler

Also keep in mind that if you're using Lync Online through Office 365, the web scheduler is available there as well. Just head over to https://webdir0b-ext.online.lync.com/Scheduler to schedule your meetings.

Enjoy!

Mike Pfeiffer – Microsoft MVP
Director of Unified Communications
Interface Technical Training

The post Implementing the Lync Server 2010 Web Scheduler appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/implementing-lync-server-2010-web-scheduler/feed/ 1
Creating a Custom RBAC Role with the Lync Server Management Shell https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/creating-a-custom-rbac-role-with-the-lync-server-management-shell/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/creating-a-custom-rbac-role-with-the-lync-server-management-shell/#comments Mon, 23 Apr 2012 16:20:16 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=4382 Lync 2010 comes with several pre-defined RBAC roles. The thing is, they're all globally scoped. For example, if I add your account to the CSUserAdministrator USG in Active Directory, you now have the ability to modify, disable, or move users (to name a few) anywhere in the organization. Let's take a look at a few … Continue reading Creating a Custom RBAC Role with the Lync Server Management Shell

The post Creating a Custom RBAC Role with the Lync Server Management Shell appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
Lync 2010 comes with several pre-defined RBAC roles. The thing is, they're all globally scoped. For example, if I add your account to the CSUserAdministrator USG in Active Directory, you now have the ability to modify, disable, or move users (to name a few) anywhere in the organization. Let's take a look at a few ways you can customize this.

User Scopes

First, let's say that we have a globally dispersed topology, and administrators in the respective regions should only be able to manage the users in the same location. What we would want to do is create a custom role based off of the existing CSUserAdministrator. We would then scope this role to a specific OU, such as the "North America" OU, where the users are located.

The first thing you need to do is come up with a name for your custom RBAC role. In this case, we'll use NA_Lync_Admins. Next, you'll need to create a new Active Directory Universal Security Group named NA_Lync_Admins. Finally, fire up the Lync Management Shell and use the New-CSAdminRole cmdlet to create your custom role:

New-CsAdminRole -Identity NA_Lync_Admins -Template CsUserAdministrator -UserScopes “OU:OU=North America,DC=pfeiffer,DC=ms"

Notice that in this example, the distinguished name for the North America OU is used, and prefixed with the tag "OU:". This is the piece that creates a user based scope connected to that OU. Anyone added to the NA_Lync_Admins group in AD will be able to manage users in that location in AD.

Server Scopes

Now, in our geographically dispersed deployment, we also need to control modifications to server settings. This is where config scopes come into play. For example, the CSServerAdministrator provides admins with the ability to modify settings on specific servers. Since we have locations all over the globe, our Lync topology probably has several sites. We can use these site definitions to act as a configuration scope for our custom role.

Just as before, we'll create a new Active Directory Universal Security Group for each regional group of server administrators. This time, we'll create one called Phx_Lync_Server_Admins for our site in Phoenix. First, we need to run Get-CSSite to determine the site id:

Next, we can use the New-CSAdminRole cmdlet to create the custom role:

New-CsAdminRole -Identity Phx_Lync_Server_Admins -Template CsServerAdministrator -ConfigScopes site:1

Again, its important that the custom role match the name of our group in AD. Also, notice that this time we've used the -ConfigScopes parameter to define the site scope. Ensure that, just as above, you've used the "site:" tag, followed by the site id for that particular site. Just as before, when an administrator is added to the Phx_Lync_Server_Admins, he'll be able to make configuration changes on servers that are only part of that site in the Lync topology.

Enjoy!

Mike Pfeiffer – Microsoft MVP
Director of Unified Communications
Interface Technical Training

The post Creating a Custom RBAC Role with the Lync Server Management Shell appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/creating-a-custom-rbac-role-with-the-lync-server-management-shell/feed/ 1
Quick Tip: Bing 411 Directory Assistance with Lync 2010 https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/quick-tip-bing-411-directory-assistance-with-lync-2010/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/quick-tip-bing-411-directory-assistance-with-lync-2010/#respond Mon, 27 Feb 2012 19:36:21 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=3197 Those of us who have lived in the US and Canada for years have gotten used to dialing 411 for directory assistance. As you probably know, you can use a 411 service to get address and phone number information for an individual person or place of business. If you’re going with a pure VOIP deployment … Continue reading Quick Tip: Bing 411 Directory Assistance with Lync 2010

The post Quick Tip: Bing 411 Directory Assistance with Lync 2010 appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
Those of us who have lived in the US and Canada for years have gotten used to dialing 411 for directory assistance. As you probably know, you can use a 411 service to get address and phone number information for an individual person or place of business.

If you’re going with a pure VOIP deployment with Lync, your SIP trunk vendor might not provide this functionality, but you can still allow your users to dial a free 411 service. There are a handful of them available, and I’ve found that Bing’s free 411 service works great for this.

Bing 411 is a toll free audio service that gives you directions, traffic information, weather conditions, movie show times, and more from your phone. To leverage this through Lync, you can create a normalization rule will allow users to dial 411 and have that translate to Bing’s toll free number.

Here’s a screenshot of how you would add this normalization rule to the global dial plan:

For more details on Bing 411, check out disoverbing.com/mobile/411

Enjoy!

Mike Pfeiffer – Microsoft MVP
Director of Unified Communications
Interface Technical Training

The post Quick Tip: Bing 411 Directory Assistance with Lync 2010 appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/quick-tip-bing-411-directory-assistance-with-lync-2010/feed/ 0