Office 365 – Interface Technical Training https://www.interfacett.com Fri, 23 Jun 2017 23:40:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Business Intelligence (BI) solution: SQL Server, Office, and SharePoint https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/business-intelligence-bi-solution-sql-server-office-and-sharepoint/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/business-intelligence-bi-solution-sql-server-office-and-sharepoint/#respond Tue, 04 Jun 2013 16:18:40 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=13217 Do you really need to buy a business intelligence solution in order to get business intelligence? Maybe not. If you’ve got more or less all of your data in the latest version of SQL Server, and you’re using the latest versions of Office and SharePoint, you’d be surprised what you can cobble together on your … Continue reading Business Intelligence (BI) solution: SQL Server, Office, and SharePoint

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Do you really need to buy a business intelligence solution in order to get business intelligence?

Maybe not. If you’ve got more or less all of your data in the latest version of SQL Server, and you’re using the latest versions of Office and SharePoint, you’d be surprised what you can cobble together on your own.

Now, I should start by admitting that this isn’t for the faint of heart – you’ll need to decent database, SharePoint, and BI skills on-staff in order to pull together this do-it-yourself kind of system. But for organizations that currently have only very limited or small-scale BI needs, this might be a great stopgap solution until you’re ready to move to a fully-fledged BI system.

Most of what people consider to be a “BI system” consists of things like scorecards and dashboards, and SharePoint – backed up by SQL Server – can certainly deliver those if you’re willing to develop them yourself. Microsoft Excel’s new PowerPivot add-in also provides pretty amazing analytic capabilities, all in a self-service package. Backed by SharePoint, PowerPivot can even publish shared analysis reports. In fact, it’s the combination of Excel, PowerPivot, SQL Server, and SharePoint that are letting many businesses dip their tows into the waters of BI, without having to invest in a full-scale BI system.

Excel has always had its PivotTable feature, but it had some definite limitations in terms of how much data it could deal with at once. PowerPivot blows that limit out of the water by relying on SQL Server to provide some of the back-end power, including the ability to integrate data from multiple data sources. Creating “mashups” of data from many sources is a key benefit of BI systems. The in-memory analysis engine used by PowerPivot removes the need for a pre-built data warehouse that has to be loaded with data in advance; instead, you rely on live data from live sources and crunch the numbers on today’s seriously-powerful, multi-core, gigabytes-of-memory computers. Once you’ve crunched those numbers, save the final data models into SharePoint, where other users can easily access them and even collaborate on them.

There’s a downside: That old Pentium 4 laptop sitting on your CFO’s desk isn’t going to be up to the task. You’ll need a late-model processor with multiple cores, and the more memory you can stuff into the machine, the better – think about 4GB as a reasonable minimum. That’s peanuts compared to the cost of a full BI system, and it’s an inexpensive way to get started on analytics.

Let me conclude by saying that I’m not suggesting that a small business can build their own BI system that’ll be just as rich and powerful as a commercial system. Far from it. But a small business can start getting some of the benefits of business intelligence with a little knowledge, a lot of elbow grease, and the right self-service technologies. Doing so will almost inevitably whet users’ appetites for more, and that’ll put you on the path toward a full-scale BI system that’s right for your organization.

Don Jones
PowerShell and SQL Instructor – Interface Technical Training
Phoenix, AZ

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Exchange Online: Add a Secondary E-Mail Address to a Synchronized Account https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/exchange-online-add-secondary-e-mail-address-synchronized-account/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/exchange-online-add-secondary-e-mail-address-synchronized-account/#comments Fri, 14 Sep 2012 15:31:20 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=6974 Adding an additional SMTP address to a recipient is usually a trivial task in pretty much any version of Exchange. The exception to this is when you're using Exchange Online through Office 365, along with Directory Syncronization (DirSync). When a mailbox for a synchronized user resides in Exchange Online, attempting to add an additional e-mail … Continue reading Exchange Online: Add a Secondary E-Mail Address to a Synchronized Account

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Adding an additional SMTP address to a recipient is usually a trivial task in pretty much any version of Exchange. The exception to this is when you're using Exchange Online through Office 365, along with Directory Syncronization (DirSync). When a mailbox for a synchronized user resides in Exchange Online, attempting to add an additional e-mail address to the recipient with Exchange Online tools will result in an error. It will be something fairly descriptive, like "this can't be performed because the object is being synchronized from your on-premises organization".

As you might expect, the user object in the cloud is read-only. So, the solution is to add the additional address to the proxyAddresses attribute of the on-premises Active Directory account, and allow that change to be synced to the cloud. There are a couple of ways to accomplish this, depending on the scenario.

Exchange NOT On-Prem (No Hybrid)

If all of your mailboxes reside in Exchange Online, and you do not have Exchange on-premises, you'll most likely need to modify this manually using Active Directory Users and Computers (ADUC), ADSIEdit, or PowerShell.

Assuming you've got the RSAT tools installed, fire up ADUC, and go to View > and select Advanced Features.

Go to the properties of the account. On the Attributes tab, scroll down to proxyAddresses. Highlight it and click on Edit.

At this point, you can add an additional address to the proxyAddresses collection. Make sure you prefix the address with "smtp:" and that the domain you're attempting to use has been verified in your Office 365 tenant.

You can also use ADSIEdit to perform this task. Simply locate the user in your domain partition, and edit the proxyAddresses collection in similar fashion. The other option is to use PowerShell.

If you have a DC running the Active Directory Gateway Service for PowerShell, and you have the RSAT tools for AD installed on your Windows 7 Client, you can use AD PowerShell (see my previous post for details on this).

Import the AD PowerShell module, and use the Set-ADUser cmdlet to update the proxyAddresses collection:

[powershell]
#Import the AD PowerShell cmdlets
Import-Module AcitveDirectory

#Store an instance of the user in a variable
$user = Get-ADUser jason -Properties proxyAddresses

#Append the e-mail address to the proxyAddresses collection
$user.proxyAddresses += 'jason.helmick@office365lab.us'

#Update the object
Set-ADUser -Instance $user
[/powershell]

Whether you use the GUI or PowerShell to make this change, DirSync still needs to run before the e-mail address will be usable. You can wait the default 3 hours, or manually force a DirSync.

Exchange On-Prem – Hybrid Deployment

If you have a hybrid deployment and Exchange is on-premises, then you're in luck because this will be much easier. You can use the Exchange Management Console (EMC) to make this change. Fire up EMC and browse to the Recipient Configuration node, and select Mail Contact. Find the contact that needs to be updated and view the properties. You can add the address on the E-mail Addresses tab.

Again, make sure you're looking under Mail Contact, NOT Mailbox in EMC. Cloud mailboxes are represented on-prem as mail-enabled users. Once you're change has been made, you can wait for DirSync, or force it to run and the user will have their new e-mail address.

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Webcast: Managing Office 365 with PowerShell by MVP Mike Pfeiffer – May 23rd https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/webcast-managing-office-365-with-powershell-by-mvp-mike-pfeiffer-may-23rd/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/webcast-managing-office-365-with-powershell-by-mvp-mike-pfeiffer-may-23rd/#respond Fri, 18 May 2012 20:39:54 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=5492 Interface Technical Director and Microsoft MVP; Mike Pfeiffer will be conducting an Idera Webcast: Managing Office 365 with PowerShell on May 23, 2012 from 12:00 – 1:00pm (Central Time) This webcast will help you extend your administrative capabilities in Office 365 with Windows PowerShell. Learn how to use the Microsoft Online Services Module for Windows … Continue reading Webcast: Managing Office 365 with PowerShell by MVP Mike Pfeiffer – May 23rd

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Interface Technical Director and Microsoft MVP; Mike Pfeiffer will be conducting an Idera Webcast: Managing Office 365 with PowerShell on May 23, 2012 from 12:00 – 1:00pm (Central Time)

This webcast will help you extend your administrative capabilities in Office 365 with Windows PowerShell. Learn how to use the Microsoft Online Services Module for Windows PowerShell to provision accounts, manage licensing, and more. Find out how to perform common Exchange Online administrative tasks such as creating shared mailboxes, updating recipients, and assigning permissions. In this session you'll see several live demonstrations, and you'll walk away with code samples that will help you automate routine tasks in the cloud.

Registration is free but space is limited.

Mike Pfeiffer Interface Technical Training

 

 

 

Mike Pfeiffer’s upcoming live classes at Interface Technical Training:

(R) = This live class can also be attended online with RemoteLive
View our complete course schedule

PS350EX: PowerShell for Exchange Server (R)
Learn how to use PowerShell to manage and maintain your Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 environment and get the core PowerShell concepts required to master the Exchange Management Shell in this Interface exclusive course.

EXCH2010: Designing and Implementing Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 (R)
Our flagship Hard Hat Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 course. Install, configure, design, implement, and troubleshoot mail server Microsoft Exchange 2010.

10533: Deploying Configuring and Administering Microsoft Lync Server 2010
This five-day instructor-led course teaches IT professionals how to deploy, configure, and administer a Microsoft Lync Server 2010 solution.

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Setting up an Office 365 trial with SharePoint Online https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/setting-up-an-office-365-trial-with-sharepoint-online/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/setting-up-an-office-365-trial-with-sharepoint-online/#respond Thu, 19 Apr 2012 22:36:00 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=4838 Here I will sign up for a free 30 day trial of Microsoft Office 365. (Note: This site trial may expire soon but that's to be expected) Microsoft – Try Office 365 for free for 30 days I clicked on Free Trial Then I clicked close on the chat screen. They are very responsive though if I wanted … Continue reading Setting up an Office 365 trial with SharePoint Online

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Here I will sign up for a free 30 day trial of Microsoft Office 365.
(Note: This site trial may expire soon but that's to be expected)

I clicked on Free Trial

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Then I clicked close on the chat screen. They are very responsive though if I wanted to chat I would have started a chat. I chose Professionals and small businesses and clicked FREE TRIAL.

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I filled out the information form, chose a public internet domain name address and then I was taken to this screen.

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After a while the SharePoint Online setup completes and I see the Team Site section come up . I'll click on Visit team site.

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This takes me to the team site which is a subsite of the top level site. The top level site is a publishing site, I can tell this by looking at the url.

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I'll click on the All Site Content link in the quick launch bar.

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This site has 3 libraries out of the box: Documents, Site Assets and Site Pages, and 1 List – Posts.

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As a comparison I created an on premise team site where I get a little more: 3 Libraries, 4 Lists, 1 Discussion board.

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I'll click on the Website link in the Top Link Navigation Bar.

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This takes me to the Pages Library which has 4 pages inside. Notice the tabs, I will click on the Pages tab.

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The ribbon changes, becoming contextual to interacting with the list items which in this case are pages. I'll click the New Page button to add a page.

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This launches a modal window in which I can select from some standard templates. I select Product or Service and click next.

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Here I will fill out the form to set the page properties as shown and click Finish.

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This takes me to the new page in editing mode where I can customize my content.

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I customize the content in the content area and then click in the Header area to customize the Header area.

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Here I will customize the Header Area using the Modal Window, then I click OK.

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At this point my page is ready and I'll click the save icon in the upper left. Then I click on the Home link in the navigation bar.

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Optionally I can choose File>Save & Publish.

 

This takes me to the Home Page where I can customize the content as needed.

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It doesn't get much simpler than that!!

Enjoy,
Spike Xavier
SharePoint Instructor – Interface Technical Training
Phoenix, AZ

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Video – How to use PowerShell Remoting to run Exchange Online in the cloud with Office 365 https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/video-how-to-use-powershell-remoting-to-run-exchange-online-in-the-cloud-with-office-365/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/video-how-to-use-powershell-remoting-to-run-exchange-online-in-the-cloud-with-office-365/#respond Thu, 20 Oct 2011 15:15:01 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=2099 Video Trascript: Exchange Server 2010 is built completely on top of Remote PowerShell. It also runs in the cloud with Office 365 so you can actually use PowerShell Version 2.0 Remoting to run the commandlets against the Exchange servers in the cloud. It’s actually really simple to set up, and we’ll take a look at … Continue reading Video – How to use PowerShell Remoting to run Exchange Online in the cloud with Office 365

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Video Trascript:

Exchange Server 2010 is built completely on top of Remote PowerShell. It also runs in the cloud with Office 365 so you can actually use PowerShell Version 2.0 Remoting to run the commandlets against the Exchange servers in the cloud. It’s actually really simple to set up, and we’ll take a look at how to do it.

I’ve got a standard PowerShell Version 2.0 console open and the first thing to do is create a credential object and supply Office 365 Microsoft Online Services credentials.

I’m going to do “$cred” so this is a variable, “=” and then I’m going to run the getcredential commandlet. That’ll actually prompt me for my credentials. So this is just going to store my credentials; I’m not actually authenticating anywhere right now.

What I’m going to do here is type in “admin@uclabs.onmicrosft.com.” So this is actually my Microsoft Online Services administrator account. Then I’ll enter the password in here. Once that credential object is created, I’m ready to create a new session. So I’ll say “cloud=.” And I can call that whatever I want. I’m just going to do “cloud=newpssession.”

I need to specify the configuration name. In this case it’s going to be “micosoft.exchange.” And the connection URL is going to be at the public endpoint of HTTPS, “ps.outlook.com/powershell.”

Also since we’re outside of the forest hosting the Exchange environments, we’ve got to authenticate with basic authentication. And then finally we need to allow this session configuration to redirect us to the appropriate server, because there’s hundreds and possibly thousands of Exchange servers out there.

Finally I need to specify my credential object and provide my Office 365 administrator account. So with all that in place, if I hit enter it should go out and create that session against that public endpoint. As you can see, I’m getting these warnings here. Those are OK. That’s basically just saying, “Hey, you’re being redirected. Instead of being on ps.outlook.com, you’re over on Pod 51011psh.” So it’s actually sending me to right place.

And if I do get PS Session at this point, you’ll see I’ve got this connection opened against this computer name. If we actually look at that computer name, I’ll type that out to FL or format. FL is the alias for Format List. So I’ll type if out to computer name. You can see that there’s our actual Exchange server that are mailbox is and all that, all our recipients are located on.

OK, now that I’ve got this session open and we’re connected to Office 365, I’m actually going to create a new variable and call it “Office 365,” and I’m going to an Import PS Session on my cloud object, which is my session that’s out there on Office 365.

So when I hit enter here, we’re basically going to go out, ask the Exchange server which commandlets are available for my account, and now those have been imported without any errors. So I can actually see here, can do a “get mailbox.” You can see that there’s all my user accounts, all my mailboxes out on the public server here, out on Office 365.

And what you’ll notice here, if you do like a “get command” on this module that we’ve created, so “$office365,” that’ll give me all the commandlets in that module. You can see that there’s a number of them out there in Office 365, so you can do things like retrieve mailboxes with “get mailbox.” Look at the inbox rules or create inbox rules, that kind of thing. You could do other things such as retrieving just users that aren’t mailbox-enabled and creating mailboxes for those users. Creating inbox rules. I think we already said that. You get the idea. There’s a ton  of commandlets in here.

Clear the screen here. All right, so if you look at that other command, “get command module,” “$office365,” we wrap that in parentheses and do a “.count,” you’ll see that we get back about 297 commandlets. So even though we’re logged in as an administrator, this is about what half of what you would see in an on-premise environment.

So you would typically see about 600 commandlets with an administrator account right out of the box in an on-premise environment. So you’ll get a little bit less because Exchange 2010 is hosted. You’ve got less control to configure server base things, such as server settings and that kind of thing.

But from here I can say “get mailbox.” Typical things that you would typically do in the shell, maybe pipe it out to “set mailbox,” change the max or change something like set a custom mail tip, or do some kind of bulk modification, moderation or retention URL, or any of that stuff. All this stuff that you typically do in the shell. You can use the help system, use “getcommand-officemodule365” to figure out commandlets are out there, and you can start scripting from there.

That’s all there is to loading the commandlets for Office 365 in Exchange Online into your PowerShell Version 2.0 console. I hope this is helpful. Check out more Drill Bits on interfacett.com.

Upcoming live Exchange & PowerShell training at Interface Technical Training:
EXCH2010: Designing and Implementing Microsoft Exchange Server 2010
PS300: PowerShell for Administrators

Is there a DrillBit™ Video you would like to see?
Let us know in the comments section below. If it’s a popular technical problem, we’ll make a DrillBit™ video with the solution.

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