PowerShell – Interface Technical Training https://www.interfacett.com Fri, 23 Jun 2017 23:40:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Using Server Manager to uninstall the MiniShell or Full Graphical Shell to convert Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter to a Core Edition https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/using-server-manager-to-uninstall-the-minishell-or-full-graphical-shell-to-convert-windows-server-2012-r2-datacenter-to-a-core-edition/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/using-server-manager-to-uninstall-the-minishell-or-full-graphical-shell-to-convert-windows-server-2012-r2-datacenter-to-a-core-edition/#respond Fri, 08 Apr 2016 16:04:15 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=22784 You have finished configuring your Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter computer with the either the MiniShell or the Full Graphical Interface and now you want to convert the computer to a Core edition. In this blog I will show you the steps to remove the graphical interfaces using Server Manager. Converting Windows Server 2012 R2 … Continue reading Using Server Manager to uninstall the MiniShell or Full Graphical Shell to convert Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter to a Core Edition

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You have finished configuring your Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter computer with the either the MiniShell or the Full Graphical Interface and now you want to convert the computer to a Core edition. In this blog I will show you the steps to remove the graphical interfaces using Server Manager.

Converting Windows Server 2012 R2 to Core edition

  1. Launch Powershell.

01-Using-Server-Manager-to-uninstall-MiniShell-or-Full-Graphical-Shell

  1. To determine syntax of features you want to uninstall, type Get-Windowsfeature.

02-Using-Server-Manager-to-uninstall-MiniShell-or-Full-Graphical-Shell

Note: To convert completely back to a Core installation both the Server Graphical Shell (Server-Gui-Shell) and the Graphical Management Tools and Infrastructure (Server-Gui-Mgmt-Infra) have to be unistalled.

Note: To convert to the MiniShell only the Server Graphical Shell (Server-Gui-Shell) has to be uninstalled.

Note: I will be converting completely back to a Core Installation.

  1. Type Uninstall-Windowsfeature Server-Gui-Mgmt-Infra, Server-Gui-Mgmt-Infra –restart.

Note: If you desire to remove the Binaries from the C:\Windows\WINSxS folder add the –remove switch to the above CMDLET.

03-Using-Server-Manager-to-uninstall-MiniShell-or-Full-Graphical-Shell04-Using-Server-Manager-to-uninstall-MiniShell-or-Full-Graphical-Shell

 

4. After the computer restarts, logon and verify the graphical interfaces have been removed.

Check back later for more blogs relating to:

Until next time – Ride Safe!

Rick Trader
Windows Server Instructor – Interface Technical Training
Phoenix, AZ

 

 

 

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How to Remotely Enable and Disable (RDP) Remote Desktop https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/how-to-remotely-enable-and-disable-rdp-remote-desktop/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/how-to-remotely-enable-and-disable-rdp-remote-desktop/#comments Fri, 04 Mar 2016 18:45:32 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=22640 By default on a Windows Server Product Windows Remote Management (WinRM) is enabled, but Remote Desktop (RDP) is Disabled.  On workstation operating systems neither is enabled by default, so if you want to be able to accomplish the following you will need to enable WinRM on the workstations. Enabling RDP remotely. Method 1:  Command Line … Continue reading How to Remotely Enable and Disable (RDP) Remote Desktop

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By default on a Windows Server Product Windows Remote Management (WinRM) is enabled, but Remote Desktop (RDP) is Disabled.  On workstation operating systems neither is enabled by default, so if you want to be able to accomplish the following you will need to enable WinRM on the workstations.

Enabling RDP remotely.

Method 1:  Command Line

To enable RDP with the Command Prompt, use the following steps.

  1. Launch the Command Prompt as Administrator.
  2. Type the following command:

Reg add “\\computername\HKLM\SYSTEM\CurentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server”  /v fDenyTSConnections /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f

 

Note:  Computername is the name of the computer you wish to enable RDP on.

NOTE:  Enabling RDP through the Command Prompt will not configure the Windows Firewall with the appropriate ports to allow RDP connections.

NOTE:  By default the local Administrators group will be allowed to connect with RDP.  Also the user that is currently logged in will also be allowed to connect.

To disable RDP with the Command Prompt, use the following steps.

  1. Launch the Command Prompt as Administrator.
  2. Type the following command:

Reg add “\\computername\HKLM \SYSTEM\CurentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server”  /v fDenyTSConnections /t REG_DWORD /d 1 /f

 

Method 2:  Using PowerShell

To enable RDP with the PowerShell, use the following steps.

Option 1

To enable RDP:

  1. Launch PowerShell as Administrator.
  2. Type the following command and create a script block and use the Invoke-Command cmdlet:

Invoke-Command –Computername “server1”, “Server2” –ScriptBlock {Set-ItemProperty -Path "HKLM:\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server" -Name "fDenyTSConnections" –Value 0}

 

NOTE:  Enabling RDP through PowerShell will not configure the Windows Firewall with the appropriate ports to allow RDP connections.

Type the following:

Invoke-Command –Computername “server1”, “Server2” –ScriptBlock {Enable-NetFirewallRule -DisplayGroup "Remote Desktop"}

 

NOTE:  By default the local Administrators group will be allowed to connect with RDP.  Also the user that is currently logged in will also be allowed to connect.

To disable RDP with the PowerShell, use the following steps.

  1. Launch PowerShell as Administrator.
  2. Type the following command:

Invoke-Command –Computername “server1”, “Server2” –ScriptBlock {Set-ItemProperty -Path "HKLM:\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server" -Name "fDenyTSConnections" –Value 1}

 

Option 2

To enable RDP RDP with the PowerShell, use the following steps.

  1. Launch PowerShell as Administrator.
  2. Create a PS Session with the desired target computer.
  3. Type the following command once possession is established:

Set-ItemProperty -Path "HKLM:\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server" -Name "fDenyTSConnections" –Value 0

 

NOTE:  Enabling RDP through PowerShell will not configure the Windows Firewall with the appropriate ports to allow RDP connections.

Type the following:

Enable-NetFirewallRule -DisplayGroup "Remote Desktop"

 

NOTE:  By default the local Administrators group will be allowed to connect with RDP.  Also the user that is currently logged in will also be allowed to connect.

To disable RDP RDP with the PowerShell, use the following steps.

  1. Launch PowerShell as Administrator.
  2. Create a PS Session with the desired target computer.
  3. Type the following command once possession is established:

Set-ItemProperty -Path "HKLM:\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server" -Name "fDenyTSConnections" –Value 1

 

Method 3:  Use Group Policy

If you have numerous Servers and/or Workstations that you need to enable RDP on and they are in the same Organization Unit structure in Active Directory you should enable RDP through Group Policy.

To enable RDP Using Group Policy.

  1. Launch the Group Policy Management Console (GPMC)
  2. Either edit an existing Group Policy Object (GPO) or create a new GPO.
  3. Navigate to the following GPO node:

Computer Configuration\Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Remote Desktop Services\Remote Desktop Session Host\Connections

001-connections-Remotely-Enable-and-Disable-RDP-Remote-Desktop

  1. In the Settings pane double click Allow users to connect remotely by using Remote Desktop Services.

002-allow-users-Remotely-Enable-and-Disable-RDP-Remote-Desktop

  1. Select the Enable Radial button select OK.

003-Remotely-Enable-and-Disable-RDP-Remote-Desktop

  1. Close the GPO editor and link the GPO to the appropriate Organizational Unit.

NOTE:  Enabling RDP through GPO will configure the Windows Firewall with the appropriate ports to allow RDP connections.

Note:  In all the methods demonstrated in this blog any member of the local Remote Desktop Users group will be able to connect to the target computers.

Until next time – Ride Safe!

Rick Trader
Windows Server Instructor – Interface Technical Training
Phoenix, AZ

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Using PowerShell to remove the MiniShell or Full Graphical Shell to convert Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter to a Core Edition https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/using-powershell-to-remove-the-minishell-or-full-graphical-shell-to-convert-windows-server-2012-r2-datacenter-to-a-core-edition/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/using-powershell-to-remove-the-minishell-or-full-graphical-shell-to-convert-windows-server-2012-r2-datacenter-to-a-core-edition/#respond Mon, 08 Feb 2016 22:15:17 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=22443 You have finished configuring your Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter computer with the either the MiniShell or the Full Graphical Interface and now you want to convert the computer to a Core edition. In this blog I will show you the steps to remove the graphical interfaces using Server Manager. Converting Windows Server 2012 R2 … Continue reading Using PowerShell to remove the MiniShell or Full Graphical Shell to convert Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter to a Core Edition

The post Using PowerShell to remove the MiniShell or Full Graphical Shell to convert Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter to a Core Edition appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

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You have finished configuring your Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter computer with the either the MiniShell or the Full Graphical Interface and now you want to convert the computer to a Core edition. In this blog I will show you the steps to remove the graphical interfaces using Server Manager.

Converting Windows Server 2012 R2 to Core edition

  1. Launch PowerShell001-Using-PowerShell-to-remove-the-MiniShell-in-Windows-Server-2012
  1. To determine syntax of features you want to uninstall, type Get-Windowsfeature.002-Get-Windowsfeature-Using-PowerShell-to-remove-the-MiniShell-in-Windows-Server-2012

Note:  To convert completely back to a Core installation both the Server Graphical Shell (Server-Gui-Shell) and the Graphical Management Tools and Infrastructure (Server-Gui-Mgmt-Infra) have to be unistalled.

Note:  To convert to the MiniShell only the Server Graphical Shell (Server-Gui-Shell) has to be uninstalled.

Note:  I will be converting completely back to a Core Installation.

  1. Type Uninstall-Windowsfeature Server-Gui-Mgmt-Infra, Server-Gui-Mgmt-Infra –restart.

Note:  If you desire to remove the Binaries from the C:\Windows\WINSxS folder add the –remove switch to the above CMDLET.

003-remove-switch-Using-PowerShell-to-remove-the-MiniShell-in-Windows-Server-2012

 

004-Using-PowerShell-to-remove-the-MiniShell-in-Windows-Server-2012

  1. After the computer restarts, logon and verify the graphical interfaces have been removed.

Check back later for more blogs relating to:

Until next time – Ride Safe!

Rick Trader
Windows Server Instructor – Interface Technical Training
Phoenix, AZ

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Methods to Enable and Disable Remote Desktop Locally https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/methods-to-enable-and-disable-remote-desktop-locally/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/methods-to-enable-and-disable-remote-desktop-locally/#respond Fri, 29 Jan 2016 16:29:02 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=22409 By default on a Windows Server Product Windows Remote Management (WinRM) is enabled, but Remote Desktop (RDP) is Disabled.  On workstation operating systems neither is enabled by default. For instructor-led Windows Server training, see our class schedule.  Enabling RDP locally. Method 1:  Graphical Interface By far the easiest way is to enable RDP through the … Continue reading Methods to Enable and Disable Remote Desktop Locally

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By default on a Windows Server Product Windows Remote Management (WinRM) is enabled, but Remote Desktop (RDP) is Disabled.  On workstation operating systems neither is enabled by default.

For instructor-led Windows Server training, see our class schedule

Enabling RDP locally.

Method 1:  Graphical Interface

By far the easiest way is to enable RDP through the graphical interface.

  1. Launch System Properties and click Remote Settings in the left hand pane.
  2. Choose the Allow remote connections to this computer radial button.
  3. Click Select Users to add users to connect via RDP.

NOTE:  By default the local Administrators group will be allowed to connect with RDP.  Also the user that is currently logged in will also be allowed to connect.

001-enable-and-disable-remote-desktop-locally

  1. Click OK to close the interface, RDP is now enabled on the compute.

NOTE:  Enabling RDP through the GIU will also configure the Windows Firewall with the appropriate ports to allow RDP connections.

NOTE:  To Disable Remote Desktop select the Don’t allow remote connections to this computer radial button.

Method 2:  Registry

To enable remote desktop by directly editing the registry use the following steps:

  1. Launch the registry editing tool by typing REGEDIT in the run.
  2. Navigate to the following node: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server
  3. Select the fDenyTSConnections Name

002-enable-and-disable-remote-desktop-locally

  1. Change the Data Value from 1 to 0, select OK.

003-enable-and-disable-remote-desktop-locally

NOTE:  Enabling RDP through the registry will not configure the Windows Firewall with the appropriate ports to allow RDP connections.

Type the following in an administrative command prompt:

Netsh advfirewall firewall set rule group=”remote desktop” new enable=yes

NOTE:  By default the local Administrators group will be allowed to connect with RDP.  Also the user that is currently logged in will also be allowed to connect.

NOTE:  To Disable Remote Desktop select enter 1 instead of 0.

Method 3:  Command Line

To enable RDP with the Command Prompt, use the following steps.

  1. Launch the Command Prompt as Administrator.
  2. Type the following command:

Reg add “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server”  /v fDenyTSConnections /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f

004-enable-RDP-with-the-Command-Prompt

NOTE:  Enabling RDP through the Command Prompt will not configure the Windows Firewall with the appropriate ports to allow RDP connections.

Type the following:

Netsh advfirewall firewall set rule group=”remote desktop” new enable=yes

NOTE:  By default the local Administrators group will be allowed to connect with RDP.  Also the user that is currently logged in will also be allowed to connect.

To disable RDP with the Command Prompt, use the following steps.

  1. Launch the Command Prompt as Administrator.
  2. Type the following command:

Reg add “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server”  /v fDenyTSConnections /t REG_DWORD /d 1 /f

Method 4:  Using PowerShell

To enable RDP with the PowerShell, use the following steps.

  1. Launch PowerShell as Administrator.
  2. Type the following command:

Set-ItemProperty -Path "HKLM:\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server" -Name "fDenyTSConnections" –Value 0

NOTE:  Enabling RDP through the Command Prompt will not configure the Windows Firewall with the appropriate ports to allow RDP connections.

Type the following:

Enable-NetFirewallRule -DisplayGroup "Remote Desktop"

005-PowerShell-enable-RDP-with-the-Command-Prompt

NOTE:  By default the local Administrators group will be allowed to connect with RDP.  Also the user that is currently logged in will also be allowed to connect.

To disable RDP with the PowerShell, use the following steps.

  1. Launch PowerShell as Administrator.
  2. Type the following command:

Set-ItemProperty -Path "HKLM:\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server" -Name "fDenyTSConnections" –Value 1

Until next time – Ride Safe!

Rick Trader
Windows Server Instructor – Interface Technical Training
Phoenix, AZ

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Using PowerShell to convert to the MiniShell on a Server 2012 R2 Datacenter Core Edition https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/using-powershell-to-convert-to-the-minishell-on-a-server-2012-r2-datacenter-core-edition/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/using-powershell-to-convert-to-the-minishell-on-a-server-2012-r2-datacenter-core-edition/#respond Tue, 26 Jan 2016 16:11:43 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=22372 You initially installed Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter Core Edition now you want to convert the installation to include the MiniShell to take care of some administrative tasks.  Once the MiniShell has been installed you will have access to all the features of the graphical Server Manager tool. In this blog I will show you … Continue reading Using PowerShell to convert to the MiniShell on a Server 2012 R2 Datacenter Core Edition

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You initially installed Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter Core Edition now you want to convert the installation to include the MiniShell to take care of some administrative tasks.  Once the MiniShell has been installed you will have access to all the features of the graphical Server Manager tool.

In this blog I will show you the steps to convert to the MiniShell.

Use the Deployment Image Servicing and Management (DISM.EXE) to determine the index number of the desired operating system in the install.wim file.

  1. Open an Administrative Command Prompt.
  2. Type dism /get-imageinfo /imagefile:d:\sources\install.wim

001-install-wim-PowerShell-to-MiniShell-on-Server-2012

Note: d: is the drive letter of the DVD drive.

  1. In our case Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter is Index : 4

Use the Deployment Image Servicing and Management (DISM.EXE) to mount the desired operating system files from the install.wim file.

Note:  If you previously had the graphical interface installed on this server you will not have to mount the installation files.

Note:  If your computer has internet access, PowerShell can retrieve the source files from Windows Update.

  1. Make a folder on the root of the C: drive to mount the installation files. Type mkdir C:\mount, type dir to ensure folder was created.

002-mount-dir-PowerShell-to-MiniShell-on-Server-2012

  1. Type dism /mount-wim /wimfile:d:\sources\install.wim /index:4 /mountdir:c:\mount /readonly. Observe the progress as the image is mounted.

003-mount-dir-PowerShell-to-MiniShell-on-Server-2012

  1. Verify the operation completed successfully.

004-mount-dir-PowerShell-to-MiniShell-on-Server-2012

Use the PowerShell to convert to the MiniShell using local source files.

  1. Launch PowerShell, type powershell in the command prompt.

005-luanch-PowerShell-to-MiniShell-on-Server-2012

Note:  The prompt turned to PS.

  1. To determine the proper syntax for the features you want to install, type get-windowsfeature then enter.

006-get-windows-feature-PowerShell-to-MiniShell-on-Server-2012

Note:  The feature we want to install is Graphical Management Tools and Infrastructure (Server-Gui-Mgmt-Infra).

  1. Type Install-windowsfeature Server-Gui-Mgmt-Infra –source c:\mount\windows\winsxs –restart

007-install-windows-feature-PowerShell-to-MiniShell-on-Server-2012

Note:  This process will take some time to complete, be patient it will finish.

 

Use the PowerShell to convert to the MiniShell using Windows Updates.

  1. Launch PowerShell, type powershell in the command prompt.

008-launch-PowerShell-to-MiniShell-on-Server-2012

Note:  The prompt turned to PS.

  1. To determine the proper syntax for the features you want to install, type get-windowsfeature then enter.

009-install-windows-feature-PowerShell-to-MiniShell-on-Server-2012

Note:  The feature we want to install is Graphical Management Tools and Infrastructure (Server-Gui-Mgmt-Infra).

  1. Type Install-Windowsfeature Server-Gui-Mgmt-Infra –restart

010-install-windows-feature-PowerShell-to-MiniShell-on-Server-2012

Note:  This process will take some time to complete, be patient it will finish.

011-restart-windows-feature-PowerShell-to-MiniShell-on-Server-2012

Note:  This process will take some time to complete and may restart multiple times.

Verify the MiniShell is installed.

  1. Once the computer restarts and you have logged on, Server Manager will automatically launch.

012-varify-PowerShell-to-MiniShell-on-Server-2012

  1. At this point all the graphical tools that can be launched from Server Manager will now be available.

Note:  There is no graphical Windows installed and there is no Internet Explorer.

Note:  If you close Server Manager and need to relaunch it just type Servermanager in the Command Prompt.

Check back later for more blogs relating to:

Until next time – Ride Safe!

Rick Trader
Windows Server Instructor – Interface Technical Training
Phoenix, AZ

The post Using PowerShell to convert to the MiniShell on a Server 2012 R2 Datacenter Core Edition appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

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Using PowerShell to convert to the Full Graphical Shell on a Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter Core Edition. https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/using-powershell-to-convert-to-the-full-graphical-shell-on-a-windows-server-2012-r2-datacenter-core-edition/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/using-powershell-to-convert-to-the-full-graphical-shell-on-a-windows-server-2012-r2-datacenter-core-edition/#comments Wed, 06 Jan 2016 16:13:27 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=22207 You initially installed Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter Core Edition now you want to convert the installation to include the Full Graphical Shell to take care of some administrative tasks.  Once the Full Graphical Shell has been installed you will have access to entire Server 2012 R2 desktop. In this post,  I will show you … Continue reading Using PowerShell to convert to the Full Graphical Shell on a Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter Core Edition.

The post Using PowerShell to convert to the Full Graphical Shell on a Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter Core Edition. appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

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You initially installed Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter Core Edition now you want to convert the installation to include the Full Graphical Shell to take care of some administrative tasks.  Once the Full Graphical Shell has been installed you will have access to entire Server 2012 R2 desktop.

In this post,  I will show you the steps to convert to the Full Graphical Shell.

Use the Deployment Image Servicing and Management (DISM.EXE) to determine the index number of the desired operating system in the install.wim file.

  1. Open an Administrative Command Prompt.
  2. Type dism /get-imageinfo /imagefile:d:\sources\install.wim

001-Using-PowerShell-to-Full-Graphica-Shell-Windows-Server-2012-R2-Datacenter

Note: d: is the drive letter of the DVD drive.

  1. In our case Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter is Index : 4

Use the Deployment Image Servicing and Management (DISM.EXE) to mount the desired operating system files from the install.wim file.

Note:  If you previously had the graphical interface installed on this server you will not have to mount the installation files.

If your computer has internet access, PowerShell can retrieve the source files from Windows Update.

  1. Make a folder on the root of the C: drive to mount the installation files. Type mkdir C:\mount, type dir to ensure folder was created.

002-mount-Using-PowerShell-to-Full-Graphica-Shell-Windows-Server-2012-R2-Datacenter

  1. Type dism /mount-wim /wimfile:d:\sources\install.wim /index:4 /mountdir:c:\mount /readonly. Observe the progress as the image is mounted.

003-mount-Using-PowerShell-to-Full-Graphica-Shell-Windows-Server-2012-R2-Datacenter

  1. Verify the operation completed successfully.

004-verify-mount-Using-PowerShell-to-Full-Graphica-Shell-Windows-Server-2012-R2-Datacenter

Use the PowerShell to convert to the Full Graphical Shell using local source files.

  1. Launch PowerShell, type powershell in the command prompt.

005-launch-Using-PowerShell-to-Full-Graphica-Shell-Windows-Server-2012-R2-Datacenter

Note:  The prompt turned to PS.

  1. To determine the proper syntax for the features you want to install, type get-windowsfeature then enter.

006-syntax-mount-Using-PowerShell-to-Full-Graphica-Shell-Windows-Server-2012-R2-Datacenter

Note:  The features we want to install is Graphical Management Tools and Infrastructure (Server-Gui-Mgmt-Infra) and Server Graphical Shell (Server-Gui-Shell).

  1. Type Install-windowsfeature Server-Gui-Mgmt-Infra,Server-Gui-Shell –source c:\mount\windows\winsxs –restart

007-install-mount-Using-PowerShell-to-Full-Graphica-Shell-Windows-Server-2012-R2-Datacenter

This process will take some time to complete, be patient it will finish.

Use the PowerShell to convert to the Full Graphical Shell using Windows Updates.

  1. Launch PowerShell, type powershell in the command prompt.

008-Using-PowerShell-to-Full-Graphica-Shell-Windows-Server-2012-R2-Datacenter

Note:  The prompt turned to PS.

  1. To determine the proper syntax for the features you want to install, type get-windowsfeature then enter.

009-proper-syntax-PowerShell-to-Full-Graphica-Shell-Windows-Server-2012-R2-Datacenter

Note:  The feature we want to install is Graphical Management Tools and Infrastructure (Server-Gui-Mgmt-Infra) and Server Graphical Shell (Server-Gui-Shell).

  1. Type Install-Windowsfeature Server-Gui-Mgmt-Infra,Server-Gui-Shell –restart

010-install-part2-PowerShell-to-Full-Graphica-Shell-Windows-Server-2012-R2-Datacenter

This process will take some time to complete, be patient it will finish.

011-almost-done-PowerShell-to-Full-Graphica-Shell-Windows-Server-2012-R2-Datacenter

This process will take some time to complete and may restart multiple times.

Verify the Full Graphical Shell is installed.

  1. Once the computer restarts and you have logged on, you will access to the Full Windows Server 2012 R2 Desktop.

012-completed-PowerShell-to-Full-Graphica-Shell-Windows-Server-2012-R2-Datacenter

Check back later for more blogs relating to:

Until next time – Ride Safe!

Rick Trader
Windows Server Instructor – Interface Technical Training
Phoenix, AZ

The post Using PowerShell to convert to the Full Graphical Shell on a Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter Core Edition. appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

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Changing the Network Location in Windows 8 and 8.1 https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/changing-the-network-location-in-windows-8-and-8-1/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/changing-the-network-location-in-windows-8-and-8-1/#respond Fri, 13 Nov 2015 15:47:37 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=21835 I recently picked up a Microsoft Surface Pro 3. I’ve always liked tablet computers and this looked to be a great opportunity to test one out in advance of Windows 10 launching. Until now I’ve mostly stayed with Windows 7 as my primary desktop operating system. Learning some of the intricacies of Windows 8.1 has … Continue reading Changing the Network Location in Windows 8 and 8.1

The post Changing the Network Location in Windows 8 and 8.1 appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

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I recently picked up a Microsoft Surface Pro 3. I’ve always liked tablet computers and this looked to be a great opportunity to test one out in advance of Windows 10 launching. Until now I’ve mostly stayed with Windows 7 as my primary desktop operating system. Learning some of the intricacies of Windows 8.1 has been interesting.

For instructor-led Windows 7 and Windows 10 Training, see our class schedule.

One frustrating bit for me has been the over-simplification of network configuration in Windows 8 and 8.1. Many of the configuration settings that were easily accessed in Windows 7 are either relocated or removed from the graphical user interface (GUI) in Windows 8.1. In particular, I had some difficulty changing the network type for a wireless network from Public (the default) to Private. This was blocking some features from working, especially Remote Desktop Connection.

I found a simple way to change the network location type of a given network with just two commands. This technique works on both wired and wireless connections.

First, open a Windows PowerShell console as an Administrator.

Next, type ipconfig and press Enter to list the local network adapters.

001-Changing-the-Network-Location-in-Windows-8

Identify the name of the network adapter you want to configure. In this screenshot I’m changing a network adapter named “vEthernet (External)”.

Before you proceed, it is important to know that if your adapter name has a space in it you need to enclose it in double-quotes for the next command.

Assuming I want to set the vEthernet (External) NIC to the Private network location, I type Set-NetConnectionProfile –interfacealias “vEthernet (External)” –NetworkCategory Private and then press Enter.

002-Changing-the-Network-Location-in-Windows-8

That’s it! No reboot or network bouncing is necessary. The change is picked up immediately.

Enjoy!

Mike Danseglio – CISSP, MCSE, and CEH

Mike Danseglio teaches IT Security Training, Windows, System Center and Windows Server 2012 classes at Interface Technical Training. His classes are available in Phoenix, AZ and online with RemoteLive™.

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CompTIA Series: Risk Analysis Calculations https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/comptia-series-risk-analysis-calculations/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/comptia-series-risk-analysis-calculations/#respond Fri, 23 Oct 2015 21:47:28 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=21727 This blog provides clarifying information related to IPSec as found on the Security+ exams. Allow me to recap my goal with this series: Although CompTIA exams are heavily based upon the published exam objectives, CompTIA tends to expand target material by exposing candidates to potential content on their certification exams. Although such questions are not … Continue reading CompTIA Series: Risk Analysis Calculations

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This blog provides clarifying information related to IPSec as found on the Security+ exams.

Allow me to recap my goal with this series:

Although CompTIA exams are heavily based upon the published exam objectives, CompTIA tends to expand target material by exposing candidates to potential content on their certification exams. Although such questions are not supposed to count toward the exam score, they may be considered valid or may be mere distractions. If they occur on one of the more time consuming simulation questions they can be rather disruptive to the candidate’s focus.

Since the exam objectives may lag technology introduction by three years or more, you may find it beneficial to consider technology extensions to existing exam objectives during your certification preparations. In that light, I will be providing a growing series that introduces new or potentially expanding content.

For instructor-led CompTIA classes, see our course schedule

My goal here is to extend the knowledge you may choose to develop when preparing for CompTIA entry level certification exams relative to Risk Analysis content.

Risk Analysis is actually one of my favorite topics in the Security+ material, since I cover Risk planning and management from a varied perspective within the PMPC Course.

One of the primary stated objectives of the CompTIA Security+ SY0-401 exam is:

“ The CompTIA Security+ exam will certify that the successful candidate has the knowledge and skills required to identify risk, to participate in risk mitigation activities, and to provide infrastructure, application, information, and operational security.”

Clearly risk management is a significant topic, ask risk value calculations will always be on the certification exam in some form. Within the detailed Exam Objectives, this blog covers the following material.

2.0 Compliance and Operational Security

2.1 Explain the importance of risk related concepts.

  • Risk calculation
  • Likelihood
  • ALE
  • Impact
  • SLE
  • ARO
  • MTTR
  • MTTF
  • MTBF

I actually prefer the PMBOK 5th Edition approach to calculating risk value better, and teach it within my Security+ classes.

Risk is defined by three elements: a risk event , the probability of the event happening and the impact (positive or negative) on the business outcome if the risk does actually occur. The risk event is an action or activity that has an uncertain outcome. Hence the probability (P) of various outcomes, and the impact (I) for each outcome. The multiplication of P*I yields an Expected Monetary Value (EMV) that is either positive or negative based on the impact (being a negative/loss or positive/gain).  Each risk is actually a cumulative outcome of all the EMV’s.

CompTIA refers to P as likelihood and I as Impact, using the same term for outcome value.

So Likelihood Times Impact or Probability Times Impact both yield a cost associated with risk occurrence that may be used to plan the budget for risk preparation or response.

One can value risk quantitatively if you have a numeric value for the probability of an event occurring, and a monetary value for the Impact should the event occur.  Methodologies include computer based simulation and manual reproductions called modeling. If you use a computer to determine the possible outcome of 1,000 coin tosses you would call it simulation. If you toss a coin 1,000 times and record the results, you call it modeling. Mathematical models like decision or probability trees are also considered quantitative risk methodologies.

Qualitative risk analysis attempts to arrive at an EMV as well, although without the benefit of starting values for the Probability or Impact. You effectively want to rank the probabilities, giving the highest likelihood a value close to 1.0 (100%) and the lowest closer to zero. You do the same for Impact, using a scale where total value loss is the highest point on the scale, and zero loss is the lowest. The simplest example of qualitative risk analysis is a Stanine sort. Sort all of the outcomes into three categories, high-medium-low. Then sort each of the categories into three subcategories. You end up with HH-MH-LW-HM-MM-LM-HL-ML-LL. You now have 9 categories which can be assigned the values of .9 to .1, respectively. You have converted a qualitative starting point to a quantitative scale. You do the same sort process with impacts, yielding 9 position scale from no loss to total loss. You now multiply the P * I and achieve a relative EMV.

Although it is not on the CompTIA Security+ list of objectives, you want to be aware of the term MTTO. MTTO – Mean Time to Obsolescence is effectively total loss of the value for the event or business objective. (Project management would relate this to BAC – Budget at Completion.)

The goal is to prepare for and respond to any risk before MTTO is reached. MTTO would suggest total project or business failure as an outcome of the risk event, or at least an unchecked or recovered risk event.

CompTIA likes to ask questions about the recovery timeline using the following terms. You want to be clear regarding their meanings.

  • MTD – Maximum Tolerable Downtime, is nearly equivalent to MTTO. If you reach MTD, you are nearly at system or business failure without the possibility of viable recovery.
  • RPO – Recovery Point Objective, is the point following a risk event at which recovery efforts begin. Note: The RPO might be before the event, for instance the point at which a full backup or recovery image was captured.
  • RTO – Recovery Time Objective, is the length of time that business operations can be resumed following a risk event.
  • MTBF – Mean time Between Failures, is the average time between the occurrences of a risk event.
  • MTTF – Mean time to Failure, is the average time before failure, typically of a non-repairable system. Note: This suggests the system or a component would need to be totally replaced. Think thread-bare tires on your car. You determine the average time before they are useless and aim to replace them beforehand.
  • MTTR – Mean Time to Recover, is the average time it takes to recover from a specific risk event.

One simple way to consider the relative terms is the following timeline.

001-CompTIA-Series-Risk-Analysis-Calculations

Note that relative placement and durations will vary based on the nature of the event and the recovery process selected.

The other math associated with Risk Analysis uses the remaining three variables in the Objectives list: SLE, ARO, and ALE.

  • SLE – Single Loss expectancy. The Impact of a single loss event.
  • ARO – Annual Rate of Occurrence, or how often the occurrence happens within a 12 month period. Note: They may provide the actual rate, or they may suggest how frequently the event occurs (e.g. weekly, monthly, quarterly) and you will have to translate.
  • ALE – Annual Loss Expectancy. The cumulative loss based on related event occurrences during a calendar year.

SLE * ARO = ALE  for instance a $25,000 event that happens only once every four years would yield

$25,000  * .25  = $6250 as the annualized loss.

If the ARO was quarterly, then you would calculate $25,000 * 4 = $100,000.

That cover the Risk Analysis Calculations. Pretty simple, as long as you understand the terminology.

I look forward to seeing you in the classroom, or online!

Steven Fullmer
Interface Technical Training Staff Instructor

Steve teaches PMP: Project Management Fundamentals and Professional Certification, Windows 10Windows 7, Windows 8.1 and CompTIA classes in Phoenix, Arizona.

 

 

 

 

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Creating a SharePoint 2013 PowerShell Help Document with Examples https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/creating-a-sharepoint-2013-powershell-help-document-with-examples/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/creating-a-sharepoint-2013-powershell-help-document-with-examples/#respond Wed, 09 Sep 2015 17:47:16 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=21499 All of this was done inside of the SharePoint 2013 Management Shell running as Administrator in my test and development environment. Do Not Try In Production. (For instructor-led SharePoint 2013 training, see our course schedule) I first ran the following command in order to get all the SharePoint Commandlets into the variable: $com [crayon-594dceeb13a03845677419/] I … Continue reading Creating a SharePoint 2013 PowerShell Help Document with Examples

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All of this was done inside of the SharePoint 2013 Management Shell running as Administrator in my test and development environment. Do Not Try In Production.

(For instructor-led SharePoint 2013 training, see our course schedule)

I first ran the following command in order to get all the SharePoint Commandlets into the variable:

$com

$com = Get-Command “*-SP*”

I then typed $com into the shell and it wrote a list of all the SharePoint commandlets to the host screen!

Next I looped through the collection and got the help documentation including examples for each commandlet and wrote it out to a txt file using the –NoClobber (don’t overwrite) and the –Append (add to the file flags to create a text file of all the SharePoint Commandlets including their help documentation and examples using this line:

foreach($s in $com){help $s.Name –Examples | Out-File max.txt –NoClobber –Append}

(I typed it all on one line in the shell)

I then typed:

Notepad max.txt

And there it was in all its glory, my own personal detailed, comprehensive help file!

My help file is almost 800 pages when I pasted it into Microsoft Word 2013!!

I will keep both the .docx as well as the .txt versions, one for readability and one for copy pasting.

I will be working on outing it to html or xml and creating a JQuery site with the results, but that’s another blog post.

Spike Xavier
SharePoint Instructor – Interface Technical Training
Phoenix, AZ

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Using PowerShell to Reset Active Directory Passwords in Bulk https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/using-powershell-reset-active-directory-passwords-bulk/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/using-powershell-reset-active-directory-passwords-bulk/#comments Fri, 19 Sep 2014 22:04:27 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=19179 See our class schedule for complete Course Schedule Training. Classes are held in Phoenix, AZ and can be attended online from anywhere in the world with RemoteLive™. Instructor: Rick Trader  Video Transcription: Video Transcription: One of the issues you might run into after using a bulk import tool into your Active Directory database is all your User Accounts come … Continue reading Using PowerShell to Reset Active Directory Passwords in Bulk

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See our class schedule for complete Course Schedule Training.

Classes are held in Phoenix, AZ and can be attended online from anywhere in the world with RemoteLive™.

Instructor: Rick Trader

 Video Transcription:


Video Transcription:

One of the issues you might run into after using a bulk import tool into your Active Directory database is all your User Accounts come into the database with no passwords.

As a result of them coming into the database with no passwords, they’re going to be Disabled Accounts. In this short blog, I will show you how to reset all your user passwords in a specific OU along with enabling those accounts using Windows PowerShell.

First, let me show you the objects. In the Active Directory users and computers, specifically in a container called Propulsion and I have 50 User Objects.

001-Resetting-Active-Directory-User-Passwords-using-PowerShell

These user objects were all imported using the CSVDE utility. They were a part of a comma delimited file. The file included items such as Distinguished Name, their Display Name, User Type, along with what Description they’re in and it also includes their Department.

Notice that every one of these objects are disabled? I’m going to use PowerShell to set each of these User Object Passwords or and also at the same time enable the account.

I could, if it was one or two accounts, right click on the account and choose reset password

002-Resetting-Active-Directory-User-Passwords-using-PowerShell

and put in the user password and then do the next user and the next user and the next user.

003-Resetting-Active-Directory-User-Passwords-using-PowerShell

After about an hour, hour and a half of resetting these 50 accounts, I’d be done.

One thing I do want you to notice is when I’m resetting the account there’s this notification called User must change password at next log on. I could either enable or disable that.

0035-Resetting-Active-Directory-User-Passwords-using-PowerShell

In this case, I’m going to leave it enabled with the PowerShell script.

But there is one of the attributes on one of the properties that we could set that would not require them to change their password. We’re going to put in a default password. Let’s go ahead and get started.

The first thing I’m going to do is launch my PowerShell prompt. If you’re using PowerShell v2, you’ll need to import the Active Directory module. If you’re using PowerShell v3 or v4, you will not have to import the module, but I’m going to go ahead and import it anyway.

004-Resetting-Active-Directory-User-Passwords-using-PowerShell

The Active Directory module will be imported. This also when I actually run the command here in a few seconds, you won’t actually see it load the Active Directory module behind the scenes.

005-Resetting-Active-Directory-User-Passwords-using-PowerShell

We’ve now loaded the Active Directory manifest. I’m going to go ahead and do a CD/, so I have more room to type.

006-Resetting-Active-Directory-User-Passwords-using-PowerShell

PowerShell cannot pass a cleartext password to Active Directory.

I’m going to go ahead and set a variable for my password. I’m going to use the dollar sign $ and I’m going to call a PWD for my password = I’ll have it read my host and then I’m going to have it entered as a Secure String.

007-Resetting-Active-Directory-User-Passwords-using-PowerShell

This way what’ll happen is it’ll convert my password that I’m going to type in to secure string. If I hit enter, it’s going to ask me for my password.

008-Resetting-Active-Directory-User-Passwords-using-PowerShell

I’ll have to type in a password that meets the complexity requirements of Active Directory. Now, if I just do a $pwd to bring up the variable, notice it says my variable is a SecureString.

009-Resetting-Active-Directory-User-Passwords-using-PowerShell

I’ll now be able to pass this into my Active Directory environment. I’m going clear the screen.

The next thing I want to do is I want to go get my AD-users. If I want to get a specific AD-user, I could get one account and I could type in here the account.

010-Resetting-Active-Directory-User-Passwords-using-PowerShell

I’m going to do a filter. I want to find all the User Accounts that are Disabled inside the OU because it came in as a disabled account. I don’t want to be resetting passwords for user objects that were already enabled. So I’ll set Enabled is equal to false.

011-Resetting-Active-Directory-User-Passwords-using-PowerShell

I also wanted to do a -SearchBase inside a specific OU. The OU will be Propulsion in a domain container USSHQ in the domain container local.

012-Resetting-Active-Directory-User-Passwords-using-PowerShell

All I’m going to do here is I’m just going to hit enter and have it bring me back the results.

I want to make sure these are the use. I’m going to go ahead and run it and notice it brings up all my user objects.

013-Resetting-Active-Directory-User-Passwords-using-PowerShell

Once it runs, I’m just going to go look and notice any one of the users. I have a user called Shaun Sparks. They’re not enabled. They’re user object and they are located in the proportion OU.

014-Resetting-Active-Directory-User-Passwords-using-PowerShell

These are the users I want to reset the password for.

I always want to do this first. I want to make sure I’m resetting the appropriate User Object. I’m going to come in. I’m just going to up arrow once and now I’m going to pipe [ | ], so that as an object gets added in to the pipeline it’ll run the next command on here.

015-Resetting-Active-Directory-User-Passwords-using-PowerShell

The command I’m going to run is Set‑ADAcountPassword and I’ll do a TAB complete and it eventually will work around AD account password.

Then, space and I’m going to put in a ‑NewPassword as the attribute, space.

016-Resetting-Active-Directory-User-Passwords-using-PowerShell

My new password is dollar sign $PWD

017-Resetting-Active-Directory-User-Passwords-using-PowerShell

That is the variable I just set. Then I want to do a -reset, so it resets the actual password. Now I’m going to do a –PassThru so it passes the object through to Active Directory.

018-Resetting-Active-Directory-User-Passwords-using-PowerShell

At the same time, I want to enable the AD account. –enable‑adaccount, so that will enable the account.

019-Resetting-Active-Directory-User-Passwords-using-PowerShell

All this will be done at one time. Now, if I wanted to do something like set a password that never expires, I could set that attribute.

If I wanted to set it for the user didn’t have to change their password at logon, there’s attribute for change password at logon. I would set that to false. I simply do this. I hit enter and it’s going through and “no news is good news”.

I minimize PowerShell. I’ll come back into my Propulsion OU, and refresh the OU.

020-Resetting-Active-Directory-User-Passwords-using-PowerShell

Notice all of my User Accounts have just gone green. They’re all no longer disabled and all these User Accounts have been reset to a default password.

If I double-click on any account and I go and I look at the account profile, notice this check down here. The user doesn’t have to change their password, but they will because it was set that way when I reset the password.

021-Resetting-Active-Directory-User-Passwords-using-PowerShell

Using PowerShell, I can actually reset hundreds and even thousands of accounts in a manner of minutes, instead of right-clicking each user and changing the data individually.

 

Until next time, write safe…
 

Rick Trader

Windows Server Instructor – Interface Technical Training 

Phoenix, AZ

 

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