Windows 7 – Interface Technical Training https://www.interfacett.com Wed, 21 Jun 2017 19:26:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 How to Configure your Network Location in Windows 7 https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/how-to-configure-your-network-location-in-windows-7/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/how-to-configure-your-network-location-in-windows-7/#respond Mon, 01 Aug 2016 21:34:22 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=23167 In this video, Windows Server instructor Rick Trader demonstrated how to configure your network locations by using Windows 7. Rick also presented how to establish and configure network locations in Windows 10. You can watch this video on our Webinars Training website. How to Configure a Network Location in Windows 10. In a previous blog, Rick … Continue reading How to Configure your Network Location in Windows 7

The post How to Configure your Network Location in Windows 7 appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>


In this video, Windows Server instructor Rick Trader demonstrated how to configure your network locations by using Windows 7.

Rick also presented how to establish and configure network locations in Windows 10. You can watch this video on our Webinars Training website. How to Configure a Network Location in Windows 10.

In a previous blog, Rick wrote about how the Windows Firewall Profiles and how the firewall profiles are controlled through your Network Location Services.

In this video, Rick will show how to configure the Network Location Service in a Windows 7.

Video Transcription:

In a previous video, I demonstrated the Windows firewall profiles. Whether you’re talking about the standard Windows profile, or you’re talking about a Windows firewall command security settings, we have three profiles. There’s a domain based profile, a private profile, and a public profile.

In that video, we talked about the network location service controlling which profile gets chosen. In this video, I would like to show you how to control network location in Windows 7 so that you’ll be able to control which firewall profile is being used for your computer.

            For instructor-led Windows training, see our course schedule.

If I bring up my network and sharing center on my Windows 7 computer, here, you’ll notice that my computer’s in a domain network. That’s what the network location service has chosen for this machine. The question is, why did it choose that?

This computer is a member of a domain called USSHQ.local. It’s currently located in a network segment where the domain controller for USSHQ.local is currently present. As a result, the network location service chose the domain network, and in essence, it is going to force us to use our domain firewall profile.

What does that allow us to do? It allows us to be less stringent on the rules for the unsolicited communications that this computer’s going to be receiving. What I do want to point out is, even though I’m in a domain‑based network, if I bring up my Windows Explorer, and I bring up my network, notice I can’t see any other computers on my network.

Windows, by default, does not turn on the network discovery service, or the file share service, even for a computer that’s in the corporate network, so you have to turn that on. Once you turn that on, you’ll be able to discover other computers in your corporate network, which means you’ll be able to browse. Other computers will be able to browse you, also.

Let me close that. Let me simulate putting this computer into a different network segment where there’s not a domain controller. In Hyper‑V, I have another network here, I just called it external. When this computer connects to the external network, notice it’s automatically going to choose a public network.

The reason why it chose the public network is, I’d already been messing around with this computer before, and that’s the setting I left it in. What is a public network? A public network means you’re connecting this computer to a network, maybe, at a free WiFi at the airport, or free WiFi at a coffee shop. You may be at a conference, and you’re connecting your computer to the WiFi at the conference, you would want to choose public.

We’ll talk about private in a few minutes, and I’ll talk about what we want to connect that. Notice that when I’m in the public network, if I bring up my Windows Explorer, and I come down to the network, even though I’ve chosen to be in a public network, it still allows me to put myself in an unsafe situation by turning on network discovery and file sharing, so I can browse that wide open network, which also means I can also be browsed.

Let me show you how I would change this. In Windows 7, when I first connect the computer to a network, and it’s never been connected before, this box pops up from the network location service. It’s going to ask me, am I in a home network, am I in a work network, or am I in a public network?

If I choose either one of these, both of these are going to put me into a private network. The assumption is, I’m connecting to a network that has some type of protection between the computer and the Internet. I’m not a direct connect to the Internet.

There’s a firewall of some sort, there could be a proxy server of some sort, a network address translation device. There’s something between me and that firewall, in that environment. This is what puts us into a private profile. If I come in here, what’s a little bit confusing is, if I choose a home network, and then I go ahead and hit cancel, because what it’s trying to do now is set up a home group, notice it put me into this home network.

This home network, from the firewall perspective, is a private network. If I change my home network to a work network, again, it’s assuming that I’m behind some type of protection. I might be at a training center like here at Interface, where we have devices that protect you from the Internet. You would choose a work network.

You may go into a small branch office your company may have that doesn’t have a domain controller at, you could choose a work network. Again, this in essence, is going to choose our private profile in the firewall, so I can be less stringent than the public, but more stringent than the domain base.

That’s how simple it is to change your network location service, which in turn changes what network profile we’re in for the firewall. To see how this is done in Windows 8 and how it’s done in Windows 10, at the bottom of the transcript will be links to a similar video to this.

There’s also a link at the bottom down there that discusses the blog on what the Windows firewall profiles are, and how they control them, and how to actually set them in the tools. As always, ride safe.


Rick Trader
Windows Server Instructor – Interface Technical Training
Phoenix, AZ

The post How to Configure your Network Location in Windows 7 appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/how-to-configure-your-network-location-in-windows-7/feed/ 0
Using Microsoft Management Console to Access Remote Devices https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/using-microsoft-management-console-to-access-remote-devices/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/using-microsoft-management-console-to-access-remote-devices/#respond Mon, 07 Mar 2016 18:44:18 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=22656 One of my students recently asked how to configure his system for occasional access to view Event Viewer on a remote system. While you can take the time to enable and configure either Remote Desktop or an Event Collection Subscription both of these options can be complex and require pre-planning and configuration on both systems. … Continue reading Using Microsoft Management Console to Access Remote Devices

The post Using Microsoft Management Console to Access Remote Devices appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
One of my students recently asked how to configure his system for occasional access to view Event Viewer on a remote system. While you can take the time to enable and configure either Remote Desktop or an Event Collection Subscription both of these options can be complex and require pre-planning and configuration on both systems. You can review my blogs for creating Remote Assistance or Remote Desktop sessions(including firewall elements) for details creating more comprehensive access.

For occasional access I recommend using the Microsoft Management Console and configuring a Snap-In for access to desired features on the remote system. The process is extremely simple.

1. Launch Microsoft Management Console (mmc.exe) with elevated permissions (run as Administrator) on your local system.

001-Using-Microsoft-Management-Console-to-Access-Remote-Devices

  1. Select the Snap-In for the feature that you want to manage on the remote device. Based on my student’s question, I selected the Event Viewer for this blog. Then I selected Another Computer.

002-Using-Microsoft-Management-Console-to-Access-Remote-Devices

Then you may either enter the Computer name (FQDN unless on the same domain) or Browse to find the remote computer.

  1. You may be prompted for credentials (user ID and password with administrative rights on the remote system. After entering appropriate credentials, and waiting a few moments for connection to occur, you will have an MMC toolbox that contains the Event Viewer Snap-In with the remote host name listed beside the Event Viewer tool.

003-Using-Microsoft-Management-Console-to-Access-Remote-Devices

Save the Tool by using the OK button. Then you may launch and us the MMC Snap-In to manage the remote system for each feature selected.

NOTE: You need to assure that remote services are running, and the appropriate firewall access has been allowed for remote access to the tools you wish to use.

I look forward to seeing you in the classroom, or online!

Steven Fullmer
Interface Technical Training Staff Instructor

Steve teaches PMP: Project Management Fundamentals and Professional Certification, Windows 7, Windows 8.1 and CompTIA classes in Phoenix, Arizona.

 

The post Using Microsoft Management Console to Access Remote Devices appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/using-microsoft-management-console-to-access-remote-devices/feed/ 0
Here’s how you can make your own bootable Kali Linux installer on USB https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/heres-how-you-can-make-your-own-bootable-kali-linux-installer-on-usb/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/heres-how-you-can-make-your-own-bootable-kali-linux-installer-on-usb/#comments Wed, 03 Feb 2016 23:13:59 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=22435 I use Kali Linux extensively when doing penetration testing and security assessments. Besides being fast, Kali Linux has pretty much every security tool I need built right in. On top of that, it’s free! Another benefit, the topic of a previous blog, is that Kali Linux is easily installed on and run from a USB … Continue reading Here’s how you can make your own bootable Kali Linux installer on USB

The post Here’s how you can make your own bootable Kali Linux installer on USB appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
I use Kali Linux extensively when doing penetration testing and security assessments. Besides being fast, Kali Linux has pretty much every security tool I need built right in. On top of that, it’s free!

Another benefit, the topic of a previous blog, is that Kali Linux is easily installed on and run from a USB stick. But you can also build a bootable USB stick that will install Kali Linux onto a desktop or laptop’s hard disk. Here’s how you can make your own bootable Kali Linux installer on USB.

First, gather the necessary supplies. These are:

  • A working PC running Windows 7 or later. I build the image from a current PC.
  • A blank USB stick. It must be 8GB or larger, and should be USB 3 for speed.
  • The original installation ISO from Kali.org. Do not download it from anywhere else, as you never know what you’re getting..
  • Win32 Disk Imager. I always grab the most current version directly from Win32 Disk Imager

Before mucking with the software I insert the USB stick in the PC and make sure it is recognized. I also remove any other USB or removable media to prevent mishaps.

Next, I fire up Win32 Disk Imager. Yes, I know the name implies Windows, but this powerful little tool works quite well for Linux too.

002-win-32-disk-manager-Kali-Linux-installer-on-USB.

It’s got a lovely clean interface! Notice how it found the USB stick mounted as drive E on the right side.

Now I click the blue folder icon to the right of the Image File box. This opens a file browse window. I browse to the downloaded Kali Linux ISO and click OK.

Special note: If the ISO doesn’t appear on the file list, drop down the file type and choose *.* because, by default, Win32 Disk Imager only displays IMG files.

002-win-32-disk-manager-Kali-Linux-installer-on-USB.

Now I click Write. Win32 Disk Imager automatically formats the USB stick as bootable and copies the Kali Linux files into the proper locations. After about 5 minutes Win32 Disk Imager announces that it’s finished.

Now insert the USB stick in the PC where you want to install Kali Linux and start it up. When prompted, choose to boot to USB. If you’re not prompted, you may have to configure the computer’s BIOS to enable USB boot.

When booted, the Kali Linux USB installation provides this menu:

003-how-you-can-make-your-own-bootable-Kali-Linux-installer-on-USB.

That dragon logo… awesome. Best. OS logo. Ever.

Now uses the down arrow to move the selection to Graphical install. This begins the Kali Linux installation process where you can choose volumes, create partitions, etc.

As a lovely extra benefit you can also select Live or Live USB Persistence to run Kali Linux entirely from the USB stick without installing it. Your choice!

 

Mike Danseglio – CISSP, MCSE, and CEH

Mike Danseglio teaches IT Security Training, Windows, System Center and Windows Server 2012 classes at Interface Technical Training. His classes are available in Phoenix, AZ and online with RemoteLive™.

The post Here’s how you can make your own bootable Kali Linux installer on USB appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/heres-how-you-can-make-your-own-bootable-kali-linux-installer-on-usb/feed/ 1
Enable or Disable Network Topology Mapping in Windows 7 https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/enable-or-disable-network-topology-mapping-in-windows-7/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/enable-or-disable-network-topology-mapping-in-windows-7/#respond Mon, 01 Feb 2016 18:53:26 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=22426 A viewer of my Lynda.com Windows 7 courses recently asked: “When I choose a public network profile I can’t view a full map to secure me from exposing (sic) to hacking, but when I change to private I see all other computers. What if one of the other computer is in public profile, will I … Continue reading Enable or Disable Network Topology Mapping in Windows 7

The post Enable or Disable Network Topology Mapping in Windows 7 appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
A viewer of my Lynda.com Windows 7 courses recently asked:

“When I choose a public network profile I can’t view a full map to secure me from exposing (sic) to hacking, but when I change to private I see all other computers. What if one of the other computer is in public profile, will I still be able to find it or Will I find only the computers connected to my office for ex. and also private profile only?”

For instructor-led Windows training, see our class schedule.

The ability to create a computer ‘map’ using Windows 7 is based on the Link-layer Topology Discovery as configured in your Network Interface Card configuration.

001-Enable-or-Disable-Network-Topology-Mapping-in-Windows-7

Microsoft configures default behaviors for Link-Layer topology such that neither Domain nor Public networks allow the mapping to occur by default.  Individual users with administrative rights may also disable the ability to map their computers, regardless of Network profile, by merely disabling the Link-Layer Topology Discovery Responder.

You may change the default behavior through local (as well as site, domain, or OU based Group Policy).

  1. At a command prompt, type gpedit.msc to open the Local Group Policy Editor.(The Local Group Policy Editor is available on computers running the Professional, Enterprise, or Ultimate edition of Windows 7. These are also the only editions that can join a domain.)
  2. Navigate to Computer Configuration\Administrative Templates\Network\Link-Layer Topology Discovery.
  3. Double-click the Turn On Mapper I/O (LLTDIO) Driver policy.
  4. Select Enabled, and then select Allow Operation While In Domain.
  5. Click Next Setting.
  6. Repeat the selections for the Turn On Responder (RSPNDR) Driver policy setting, and then click OK.

For more details and references start with the full Microsoft Technet Article: Use Network Mapping on Domains and Public Networks.

Remember that centralized site, domain, and OU policies will override any localized manual or local group policy settings that you make.

I look forward to seeing you in the classroom, or online!

Steven Fullmer
Interface Technical Training Staff Instructor

Steve teaches PMP: Project Management Fundamentals and Professional Certification, Windows 7, Windows 8.1 and CompTIA classes in Phoenix, Arizona.

 

The post Enable or Disable Network Topology Mapping in Windows 7 appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/enable-or-disable-network-topology-mapping-in-windows-7/feed/ 0
Methods to Enable and Disable Remote Desktop Locally https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/methods-to-enable-and-disable-remote-desktop-locally/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/methods-to-enable-and-disable-remote-desktop-locally/#respond Fri, 29 Jan 2016 16:29:02 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=22409 By default on a Windows Server Product Windows Remote Management (WinRM) is enabled, but Remote Desktop (RDP) is Disabled.  On workstation operating systems neither is enabled by default. For instructor-led Windows Server training, see our class schedule.  Enabling RDP locally. Method 1:  Graphical Interface By far the easiest way is to enable RDP through the … Continue reading Methods to Enable and Disable Remote Desktop Locally

The post Methods to Enable and Disable Remote Desktop Locally appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
By default on a Windows Server Product Windows Remote Management (WinRM) is enabled, but Remote Desktop (RDP) is Disabled.  On workstation operating systems neither is enabled by default.

For instructor-led Windows Server training, see our class schedule

Enabling RDP locally.

Method 1:  Graphical Interface

By far the easiest way is to enable RDP through the graphical interface.

  1. Launch System Properties and click Remote Settings in the left hand pane.
  2. Choose the Allow remote connections to this computer radial button.
  3. Click Select Users to add users to connect via RDP.

NOTE:  By default the local Administrators group will be allowed to connect with RDP.  Also the user that is currently logged in will also be allowed to connect.

001-enable-and-disable-remote-desktop-locally

  1. Click OK to close the interface, RDP is now enabled on the compute.

NOTE:  Enabling RDP through the GIU will also configure the Windows Firewall with the appropriate ports to allow RDP connections.

NOTE:  To Disable Remote Desktop select the Don’t allow remote connections to this computer radial button.

Method 2:  Registry

To enable remote desktop by directly editing the registry use the following steps:

  1. Launch the registry editing tool by typing REGEDIT in the run.
  2. Navigate to the following node: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server
  3. Select the fDenyTSConnections Name

002-enable-and-disable-remote-desktop-locally

  1. Change the Data Value from 1 to 0, select OK.

003-enable-and-disable-remote-desktop-locally

NOTE:  Enabling RDP through the registry will not configure the Windows Firewall with the appropriate ports to allow RDP connections.

Type the following in an administrative command prompt:

Netsh advfirewall firewall set rule group=”remote desktop” new enable=yes

NOTE:  By default the local Administrators group will be allowed to connect with RDP.  Also the user that is currently logged in will also be allowed to connect.

NOTE:  To Disable Remote Desktop select enter 1 instead of 0.

Method 3:  Command Line

To enable RDP with the Command Prompt, use the following steps.

  1. Launch the Command Prompt as Administrator.
  2. Type the following command:

Reg add “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server”  /v fDenyTSConnections /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f

004-enable-RDP-with-the-Command-Prompt

NOTE:  Enabling RDP through the Command Prompt will not configure the Windows Firewall with the appropriate ports to allow RDP connections.

Type the following:

Netsh advfirewall firewall set rule group=”remote desktop” new enable=yes

NOTE:  By default the local Administrators group will be allowed to connect with RDP.  Also the user that is currently logged in will also be allowed to connect.

To disable RDP with the Command Prompt, use the following steps.

  1. Launch the Command Prompt as Administrator.
  2. Type the following command:

Reg add “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server”  /v fDenyTSConnections /t REG_DWORD /d 1 /f

Method 4:  Using PowerShell

To enable RDP with the PowerShell, use the following steps.

  1. Launch PowerShell as Administrator.
  2. Type the following command:

Set-ItemProperty -Path "HKLM:\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server" -Name "fDenyTSConnections" –Value 0

NOTE:  Enabling RDP through the Command Prompt will not configure the Windows Firewall with the appropriate ports to allow RDP connections.

Type the following:

Enable-NetFirewallRule -DisplayGroup "Remote Desktop"

005-PowerShell-enable-RDP-with-the-Command-Prompt

NOTE:  By default the local Administrators group will be allowed to connect with RDP.  Also the user that is currently logged in will also be allowed to connect.

To disable RDP with the PowerShell, use the following steps.

  1. Launch PowerShell as Administrator.
  2. Type the following command:

Set-ItemProperty -Path "HKLM:\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server" -Name "fDenyTSConnections" –Value 1

Until next time – Ride Safe!

Rick Trader
Windows Server Instructor – Interface Technical Training
Phoenix, AZ

The post Methods to Enable and Disable Remote Desktop Locally appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/methods-to-enable-and-disable-remote-desktop-locally/feed/ 0
How to Create a Bootable USB Installation for Kali Linux https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/how-to-create-a-bootable-usb-installation-for-kali-linux/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/how-to-create-a-bootable-usb-installation-for-kali-linux/#comments Mon, 14 Dec 2015 17:29:21 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=22017 I use Kali Linux extensively when doing penetration testing and security assessments. Besides being fast, Kali Linux has pretty much every security tool I need built right in. On top of that, it’s free! For instructor-led Windows 10 training, see our course schedule. Another benefit, the topic of this blog, is that Kali Linux is … Continue reading How to Create a Bootable USB Installation for Kali Linux

The post How to Create a Bootable USB Installation for Kali Linux appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
I use Kali Linux extensively when doing penetration testing and security assessments. Besides being fast, Kali Linux has pretty much every security tool I need built right in. On top of that, it’s free!

For instructor-led Windows 10 training, see our course schedule.

Another benefit, the topic of this blog, is that Kali Linux is easily installed on and run from a USB stick. Here’s how you can make your own bootable Kali Linux USB stick.

First, gather the necessary supplies. These are:

  • A working PC running Windows 7 or later. I build the image from a current PC.
  • A blank USB stick. It must be 8GB or larger, and should be USB 3 for speed.
  • The original installation ISO from Kali.org. Do not download it from anywhere else, as you never know what you’re getting.
  • Win32 Disk Imager. I always grab the most current version directly from SourceForge.

Before messing with the software I insert the USB stick in the PC and make sure it is recognized. I also remove any other USB or removable media to prevent mishaps.

Next, I fire up Win32 Disk Imager.

01-Create-a-Bootable-USB-Installation-for-Kali-Linux

It’s got a lovely clean interface! Notice how it found the USB stick mounted as drive E on the right side.

Now I click the blue folder icon to the right of the Image File box. This opens a file browse window. I browse to the downloaded Kali Linux ISO and click OK.

Special note: If the ISO doesn’t appear on the file list, drop down the file type and choose *.* because, by default, Win32 Disk Imager only displays IMG files.

02-Create-a-Bootable-USB-Installation-for-Kali-Linux

Now all I need to do is click Write. Win32 Disk Imager automatically formats the USB stick as bootable and copies the Kali Linux files into the proper locations.

After about 5 minutes Win32 Disk Imager announces that it’s finished. Now that USB stick can be used as a boot device (on any PC that boots to USB) to run Kali Linux.

Enjoy!

Mike Danseglio – CISSP, MCSE, and CEH

Mike Danseglio teaches IT Security Training, Windows, System Center and Windows Server 2012 classes at Interface Technical Training. His classes are available in Phoenix, AZ and online with RemoteLive™.

The post How to Create a Bootable USB Installation for Kali Linux appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/how-to-create-a-bootable-usb-installation-for-kali-linux/feed/ 2
How to use Enterprise Mode Site List Manager in Windows 10 and Windows 7 https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/how-to-use-enterprise-mode-site-list-manager-in-windows-10-and-windows-7/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/how-to-use-enterprise-mode-site-list-manager-in-windows-10-and-windows-7/#comments Mon, 23 Nov 2015 17:51:40 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=21880 If you are going to be configuring Enterprise Mode for IE11 (EMIE) you will need to download and use Enterprise Mode Site List Manager.  First off there are 2 versions of the tool, if you are running Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 you must use version 1 (v.1) of the tool and if you are … Continue reading How to use Enterprise Mode Site List Manager in Windows 10 and Windows 7

The post How to use Enterprise Mode Site List Manager in Windows 10 and Windows 7 appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
If you are going to be configuring Enterprise Mode for IE11 (EMIE) you will need to download and use Enterprise Mode Site List Manager.  First off there are 2 versions of the tool, if you are running Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 you must use version 1 (v.1) of the tool and if you are running Windows 10 you must use version (v.2) of the tool.  In this blog I will be downloading and using the version for Windows 7 and Windows 8.1.  The version for Windows 10 installs and works the same as v.1. For more on Enterprise Mode, see What is Enterprise Mode for Internet Explorer 11 and How to Enable It.

For instructor-led training classes, see our complete schedule

Download and install the appropriate tool.

  1. After downloading, install the tool by running the downloaded .MSI, click Next.

001-Enterprise-Mode-Site-List-Manager

  1. Accept the License Agreement and click Next.

002-Enterprise-Mode-Site-List-Manager

  1. Choose your Destination Folder and click Next.

003-Destination-Folder-Enterprise-Mode-Site-List-Manager

  1. On the Ready to install page, click Install, if UAC prompts for approval click Yes.

004-Install-Enterprise-Mode-Site-List-Manager

  1. Click Finish.

005-completed-Install-Enterprise-Mode-Site-List-Manager

Using the Enterprise Mode Site List Manager.

  1. Launch Enterprise Mode Site List Manager. Figure 1 is from v.1 and Figure 2 is from v.2.

006-Enterprise-Mode-Site-List-Manager

Figure 1

007-IE-7-Enterprise-Mode-Site-List-Manager

Figure 2

  1. To add a website click Add. Figure 3 is from v.1 and Figure 4 is from v.2.

008-Add-new-website-Enterprise-Mode-Site-List-Manager

Figure 3

009-IE-8-Enterprise-Mode-Site-List-Manager

Figure 4

Note: Here is where the difference is between v.1 and v.2, in v.2 the Open in drop down box has and option for the MSEdge along with IE 11.

  1. Type in the URL for the desired website.

Note:  Do not include HTTP:// or HTTPS:// to the URL.

010-v2-Add-new-website-Enterprise-Mode-Site-List-Manager

  1. In the Launch in area use the down carrot to choose your desired IE mode.

011-IE8-Interprise-Enterprise-Mode-Site-List-Manager

  1. After you have added all of your desired websites click File, then Save to XML. I saved my file to the desktop.
  2. This file will need to be accessible to your users when they launch IE at their desktops. I will GPO to deploy the file to my users.  Refer to the following link to get the steps on how to accomplish:  What is Internet Explorer 11 Enterprise Mode.

Until next time, RIDE SAFE!!

Rick Trader
Windows Server Instructor – Interface Technical Training
Phoenix, AZ

The post How to use Enterprise Mode Site List Manager in Windows 10 and Windows 7 appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/how-to-use-enterprise-mode-site-list-manager-in-windows-10-and-windows-7/feed/ 2
Control Panel Command Line Tools https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/control-panel-command-line-tools/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/control-panel-command-line-tools/#respond Mon, 05 Oct 2015 15:30:23 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=21612 While looking up some modifications to command lines tools, specifically those associated with launching control panel applets, I came across a couple of comprehensive or well written websites.  I bookmarked then as future resources and believe you might find them useful as well. For instructor-led training, see our complete course schedule.  The first is a … Continue reading Control Panel Command Line Tools

The post Control Panel Command Line Tools appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
While looking up some modifications to command lines tools, specifically those associated with launching control panel applets, I came across a couple of comprehensive or well written websites.  I bookmarked then as future resources and believe you might find them useful as well.

For instructor-led training, see our complete course schedule

The first is a comparison of XP, Vista, Windows 7 and Windows 8 control panel tools compiled by Tim Fisher. Tim’s list is comprehensive, though incomplete.

Rick Trader is updating a blog to support access to (forgotten) administrative passwords when rebuilding or resetting a system. Expanding the list of tools he reviewed, you also need to consider:

Nusrmgr.cpl On XP for access to control panel User Accounts
Control nsusrmgr.cpl For accessing User Accounts on Windows 7 or Windows 8.1
Lusrmgr.msc Local users and groups on Windows 7 or Windows 8/8.1
Netplwiz From the search line for Local User Account management and password reset

How-to-Geek also reminds us about the hidden User Accounts Utility – Userpasswords2 that enables additional administrative capabilities for account management. You launch Userpasswords2 by typing Control Userpasswords2 in an elevated command prompt window. The How-To Geek article also references hacks for adding the tool to Windows XP, Vista, or Windows 7 Control panels.

Darrill Gibson, author of Windows 7 Portable Command Guide: MCTS 70-680, 70-685 and 70-686 wrote an abbreviated overview that might assist with launching control panel applets from an elevated command prompt.  The value of Darrill’s article and book is their focus on some of the command line tools that you need to know to pass the Windows 7 MCTS/MCITP exams.

The list of Control Panel command line tools that I provide as a supplemental handout for my A+ students follows.  While far from comprehensive, it provides sufficient information to assist students through the current CompTIA 220-801 and 220-802 exams.

Control Panel Applications from Command Line

You can access these applets by hitting the Windows Key+R and typing Control and the app that you want. Example:  control hdwwiz.cpl

(Note: Windows Key +R is the RUN command)

Control Panel T ool Command
Accessibility Options control access.cpl
Add New Hardware control sysdm.cpl add new hardware
Add/Remove Programs control appwiz.cpl
Date/Time Properties control timedate.cpl
Display Properties control desk.cpl
FindFast control findfast.cpl
Fonts Folder control fonts
Internet Properties control inetcpl.cpl
Joystick Properties control joy.cpl
Keyboard Properties control main.cpl keyboard
Microsoft Exchangeor Windows Messaging control mlcfg32.cpl
Microsoft Mail Post Office control wgpocpl.cpl
Modem Properties control modem.cpl
Mouse Properties control main.cpl
Multimedia Properties control mmsys.cpl
Network Properties control netcpl.cplNOTE: In Windows NT 4.0, Networkproperties is Ncpa.cpl, not Netcpl.cpl
Password Properties control password.cpl
PC Card control main.cpl pc card (PCMCIA)
Power Management (Windows 95) control main.cpl power
Power Management (Windows 98) control powercfg.cpl
Printers Folder control printers
Regional Settings control intl.cpl
Scanners and Cameras control sticpl.cpl
Sound Properties control mmsys.cpl sounds
System Properties control sysdm.cpl

 

Microsoft also provides several platform specific resources, including.

Remember that many control panel applets are considered features in Windows 7 and Windows 8/8.1.  You may not find or be able to use the corresponding .cpl file until or unless you enable the feature by Turning Windows Features On or Off through the control panel.  You may also enable Windows 7 or Windows 8 Control Panel features from the Command line tool using DISM.

Don’t forget to consider PowerShell tools Show-ControlPanelItem and Get-ControlPanelItem to manage many of your control panel features and their settings.  These cmdlets are new to PowerShell 3.0.   There are a wealth of articles guiding the use of the new cmdlets, including an article with screen shots by Aman Dhally that ventures a little further than mentioning their use.

You should now be able to start your explorations.

I look forward to seeing you in the classroom, or online!

Steven Fullmer
Interface Technical Training Staff Instructor

Steve teaches PMP: Project Management Fundamentals and Professional Certification, Windows 10Windows 7, Windows 8.1 and CompTIA classes in Phoenix, Arizona.

 

 

The post Control Panel Command Line Tools appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/control-panel-command-line-tools/feed/ 0
How to Display Hidden Devices and Driver in Windows 7 https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/how-to-display-hidden-devices-and-driver-in-windows-7/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/how-to-display-hidden-devices-and-driver-in-windows-7/#respond Thu, 01 Oct 2015 21:31:55 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=21591 Windows 7 is configured to make driver installation and management as smooth as possible. Most driver management and configuration is done with the Device Manager  application. Windows attempts to keep Device Manager clean and simple by hiding a number of core drivers and low-level devices that most users do not need to see. Advanced users … Continue reading How to Display Hidden Devices and Driver in Windows 7

The post How to Display Hidden Devices and Driver in Windows 7 appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
Windows 7 is configured to make driver installation and management as smooth as possible. Most driver management and configuration is done with the Device Manager  application.

Windows attempts to keep Device Manager clean and simple by hiding a number of core drivers and low-level devices that most users do not need to see. Advanced users may need to see and configure these drivers to identify problematic configurations or change drivers.

For instructor-led Windows 7 training, see our complete course schedule.

Here’s how you display the hidden drivers in Windows 7.

  1. Open Control Panel.
  2. Click the System icon.
  3. On the left side, click Device Manager as shown in Figure 1.001-Device-Manager-Display-hidden-devides-and-files-in-windows-7
  1. The standard Device Manager display appears as shown in Figure 2.002-Device-Manager-Display-hidden-devides-and-files-in-windows-7
  1. At the top of this window, click the View menu. You can see the subtle difference already in Figure 3 with the inclusion of new nodes including Non-Plug and Play Drivers and Storage volume shadow copies.003-Device-Manager-Display-hidden-devides-and-files-in-windows-7
  1. Finally, expand any node to see the full set of devices and drivers.

Enjoy!

Mike Danseglio – CISSP, MCSE, and CEH

Mike Danseglio teaches IT Security Training, Windows, System Center and Windows Server 2012 classes at Interface Technical Training. His classes are available in Phoenix, AZ and online with RemoteLive™.

 

The post How to Display Hidden Devices and Driver in Windows 7 appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/how-to-display-hidden-devices-and-driver-in-windows-7/feed/ 0
How to Easily Delete a User Profile in Windows 7 https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/how-to-easily-delete-a-user-profile-in-windows-7/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/how-to-easily-delete-a-user-profile-in-windows-7/#respond Wed, 23 Sep 2015 22:48:01 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=21562 Occasionally you might login to a different computer with a domain account. Depending on your Active Directory configuration, your profile may be downloaded and stored on that computer, including documents, settings, and other configuration data. That can add up to a lot of wasted storage, not to mention the potential for an unauthorized person to … Continue reading How to Easily Delete a User Profile in Windows 7

The post How to Easily Delete a User Profile in Windows 7 appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
Occasionally you might login to a different computer with a domain account. Depending on your Active Directory configuration, your profile may be downloaded and stored on that computer, including documents, settings, and other configuration data. That can add up to a lot of wasted storage, not to mention the potential for an unauthorized person to discover your data.

For instructor-led Windows 7 training, see our complete course schedule

The easiest way to deal with this is simply to delete the profiles when you’re finished. Here’s how to do it in Windows 7.

  1. Open Control Panel.
  2. Click the System icon.
  3. On the left side, click Advanced system settings as shown in Figure 1.

001-Delete-a-User-Profile-in-Windows-7

  1. In the Advanced tab, in the User Profiles section click Settings. This will display the User Profiles dialog as shown in Figure 2.

002-Delete-a-User-Profile-in-Windows-7

  1. Select your user profile and click Delete. If prompted, click Yes to confirm.

That’s it! The profile is gone.

Enjoy!

Mike Danseglio – CISSP, MCSE, and CEH

Mike Danseglio teaches IT Security Training, Windows, System Center and Windows Server 2012 classes at Interface Technical Training. His classes are available in Phoenix, AZ and online with RemoteLive™.

 

The post How to Easily Delete a User Profile in Windows 7 appeared first on Interface Technical Training.

]]>
https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/how-to-easily-delete-a-user-profile-in-windows-7/feed/ 0