Windows 8 – Interface Technical Training https://www.interfacett.com Wed, 21 Jun 2017 19:26:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 How to Configure your Network Location in Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/how-to-configure-your-network-location-in-windows-8-and-windows-8-1/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/how-to-configure-your-network-location-in-windows-8-and-windows-8-1/#respond Wed, 22 Jun 2016 18:00:46 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=23005 In this video, Windows Server instructor Rick Trader demonstrated how to configure your network locations by using Windows 8 and 8.1. Rick also presented how to establish and configure network locations in Windows 10. You can watch this video on our Webinars Training website. How to Configure a Network Location in Windows 10. In a previous … Continue reading How to Configure your Network Location in Windows 8 and Windows 8.1

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In this video, Windows Server instructor Rick Trader demonstrated how to configure your network locations by using Windows 8 and 8.1.

Rick also presented how to establish and configure network locations in Windows 10. You can watch this video on our Webinars Training website. How to Configure a Network Location in Windows 10.

In a previous blog, Rick wrote about how the Windows Firewall Profiles and how the firewall profiles are controlled through your Network Location Services.

In this video, Rick will show how to configure the Network Location Service in a Windows 8 or a Windows 8.1 machine which will control your Windows Profile your computer will be using.

Until next time – Ride Safe!

Rick Trader
Windows Server Instructor – Interface Technical Training
Phoenix, AZ

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Windows 8 Support Has Ended https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/windows-8-support-has-ended/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/windows-8-support-has-ended/#respond Fri, 15 Jan 2016 16:14:01 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=22282 Are you still running Windows 8 and haven’t upgraded to Windows 8.1.  If so, mainstream support and extended support has ended as of January 12, 2016. If you are still running Windows 8 there will be no new security patches or technical support offered.  It is a simple upgrade to Windows 8.1 from Windows 8 … Continue reading Windows 8 Support Has Ended

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Are you still running Windows 8 and haven’t upgraded to Windows 8.1.  If so, mainstream support and extended support has ended as of January 12, 2016.

If you are still running Windows 8 there will be no new security patches or technical support offered.  It is a simple upgrade to Windows 8.1 from Windows 8 as the upgrade is seen as a service pack.

So what are you waiting for?

Note:  Once you have upgraded to Windows 8.1 your computer is now qualified for the free upgrade to Windows 10.

So I ask again “What are you waiting for?”

Until next time, RIDE SAFE!!!

Rick Trader
Windows Server Instructor – Interface Technical Training
Phoenix, AZ

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Where did BIOS [UEFI] Setup Go in Windows 8.1 and Windows 10? https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/where-did-bios-uefi-setup-go-in-windows-8-1-and-windows-10/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/where-did-bios-uefi-setup-go-in-windows-8-1-and-windows-10/#respond Wed, 16 Dec 2015 17:47:46 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=22035 Kali.org recently released version 2.0 of Kali Linux which Mike Danseglio like to demonstrate in our Security+  and Certified Ethical Hacking CEHv9 courses. Kali Linux easily fits onto a 32GB USB 3.0 drive and allows you to boot directly into an extremely powerful security (hacking?) system. Mike quickly updated my Patriot USB stick for me, and I raced … Continue reading Where did BIOS [UEFI] Setup Go in Windows 8.1 and Windows 10?

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Kali.org recently released version 2.0 of Kali Linux which Mike Danseglio like to demonstrate in our Security+  and Certified Ethical Hacking CEHv9 courses. Kali Linux easily fits onto a 32GB USB 3.0 drive and allows you to boot directly into an extremely powerful security (hacking?) system.

Mike quickly updated my Patriot USB stick for me, and I raced to test it on my laptop.

…and the USB stick was not recognized at boot.  (Insert frowning emoticon here).

What changed? It worked recently. Ah yes, I upgraded my laptop to Windows 10 for evaluation purposes. Might this be a cause? It turns out that in part, it was. After a little bit of research, I discovered that the symptoms are identical on Windows 8/8.1.

Once you implement Fast Boot in either Windows 8/8.1 or Windows 10, it becomes (almost) impossible to enter BIOS or UEFI setup.

I researched Lenovo keyboard options for entering BIOS/UEFI at power-on. BIOS/CMOS Setup suggest F1 on one model and Fn-F2 on the other. Both were supposed to accommodate the F12 key for an alternate Boot Menu. None of the combinations worked.

A little extra research yielded the following information from a Lenovo site.

After shutting down the Microsoft Windows 8/8.1 PC and turning the system back on, it is not possible to enter BIOS Setup (by pressing F1) or the Boot Menu (by pressing F12).

The above symptom is associated with, but not limited to, the following systems:

  • ThinkPad, ThinkCentre, ThinkStation, IdeaPad, IdeaCentre

Affected Systems (machine types, model types):

  • All models with Microsoft Windows 8/8.1 preload.

System is configured with:

  • Microsoft Windows 8/8.1 (and I discovered Windows 10 as well)

By default, a Windows 8/8.1 shutdown is not a real shutdown. Instead, it is hybrid shutdown where contents of memory are saved to disk. This allows for a faster startup. However, turning on the PC after a hybrid shutdown does not allow for pressing F1 or F12 during startup.

There are several ways to enter Setup Utility (F1) or the Boot Menu (F12) on a Microsoft Windows 8/8.1 PC as explained below:

  1. Press and hold the Shift key while selecting the Shutdown option in Windows 8. This will make the PC perform a full shutdown instead of a hybrid shutdown. Then F1 or F12 can be pressed successfully during startup.
  2. Select Restart instead of Shutdown. Then F1 or F12 can be pressed successfully during startup.
  3. Disable the fast startup option in Control Panel -> Hardware and Sound -> Power Options -> Choose what the power buttons do.

These options didn’t work for me. I just could not get the keystrokes recognized fast enough. Not by holding them down, or poising to pounce on them at the appropriate splash screen.

Here is the solution that you should be using on faster machines, particularly for Windows 10 which boots remarkably faster than Windows 8/8.1.

Use the Windows 8/8.1 or Windows 10 setup utilities:

1. Open the Charm Bar

2. Click on Settings

3. Click on Change PC Settings or All Settings (Windows 10)

4. Navigate through the setup screens to Recovery and click on Advanced Startup >> Restart Now

001-RE-environment-Windows-10

You will be rebooted into the RE environment. (Make sure you have saved and closed all your work before experimenting.)

5. Click on Troubleshoot

6. Click on Advanced Options

7. Click on UEFI Firmware Settings

002-UEFI-Firmware-Settings-Windows-10

8. Click on Restart

 Once you click on restart, your system will be rebooted into the CMOS setup/UEFI interface where you may change your settings, including the device boot sequence, recognition of legacy boot devices, fast boot mode or other elements that will enable you to boot to alternate devices.

Et Voila! I was able to alter the boot sequence and recognize my Kali USB boot device.

I look forward to seeing you in the classroom, or online!

Steven Fullmer
Interface Technical Training Staff Instructor

Steve teaches PMP: Project Management Fundamentals and Professional Certification, Windows 7, Windows 8.1 and CompTIA classes in Phoenix, Arizona.

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Changing the Network Location in Windows 8 and 8.1 https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/changing-the-network-location-in-windows-8-and-8-1/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/changing-the-network-location-in-windows-8-and-8-1/#respond Fri, 13 Nov 2015 15:47:37 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=21835 I recently picked up a Microsoft Surface Pro 3. I’ve always liked tablet computers and this looked to be a great opportunity to test one out in advance of Windows 10 launching. Until now I’ve mostly stayed with Windows 7 as my primary desktop operating system. Learning some of the intricacies of Windows 8.1 has … Continue reading Changing the Network Location in Windows 8 and 8.1

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I recently picked up a Microsoft Surface Pro 3. I’ve always liked tablet computers and this looked to be a great opportunity to test one out in advance of Windows 10 launching. Until now I’ve mostly stayed with Windows 7 as my primary desktop operating system. Learning some of the intricacies of Windows 8.1 has been interesting.

For instructor-led Windows 7 and Windows 10 Training, see our class schedule.

One frustrating bit for me has been the over-simplification of network configuration in Windows 8 and 8.1. Many of the configuration settings that were easily accessed in Windows 7 are either relocated or removed from the graphical user interface (GUI) in Windows 8.1. In particular, I had some difficulty changing the network type for a wireless network from Public (the default) to Private. This was blocking some features from working, especially Remote Desktop Connection.

I found a simple way to change the network location type of a given network with just two commands. This technique works on both wired and wireless connections.

First, open a Windows PowerShell console as an Administrator.

Next, type ipconfig and press Enter to list the local network adapters.

001-Changing-the-Network-Location-in-Windows-8

Identify the name of the network adapter you want to configure. In this screenshot I’m changing a network adapter named “vEthernet (External)”.

Before you proceed, it is important to know that if your adapter name has a space in it you need to enclose it in double-quotes for the next command.

Assuming I want to set the vEthernet (External) NIC to the Private network location, I type Set-NetConnectionProfile –interfacealias “vEthernet (External)” –NetworkCategory Private and then press Enter.

002-Changing-the-Network-Location-in-Windows-8

That’s it! No reboot or network bouncing is necessary. The change is picked up immediately.

Enjoy!

Mike Danseglio – CISSP, MCSE, and CEH

Mike Danseglio teaches IT Security Training, Windows, System Center and Windows Server 2012 classes at Interface Technical Training. His classes are available in Phoenix, AZ and online with RemoteLive™.

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Editing Local Security Policy in Windows 8 and 8.1 https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/editing-local-security-policy-in-windows-8-and-8-1/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/editing-local-security-policy-in-windows-8-and-8-1/#respond Tue, 03 Nov 2015 19:08:19 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=21772 I recently picked up a Microsoft Surface Pro 3. I’ve always liked tablet computers and this looked to be a great opportunity to test one out in advance of Windows 10 launching. Until now I’ve mostly stayed with Windows 7 as my primary desktop operating system. Learning some of the intricacies of Windows 8.1 has … Continue reading Editing Local Security Policy in Windows 8 and 8.1

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I recently picked up a Microsoft Surface Pro 3. I’ve always liked tablet computers and this looked to be a great opportunity to test one out in advance of Windows 10 launching. Until now I’ve mostly stayed with Windows 7 as my primary desktop operating system. Learning some of the intricacies of Windows 8.1 has been interesting.

For instructor-led Windows training see our class schedule

Many of the post-install configuration tasks that I do involve changing local security or configuration settings. I do this in Windows 7 with the Local Security Policy application. To invoke it, I just click the Pearl, type Local Security Policy, and then click the icon or press Enter as shown.

001-Editing-Local-Security-Policy-in-Windows-8

This same technique fails in Windows 8 and 8.1. Specifically, the Local Security Policy application is not listed in the Metro UI, nor are any shortcuts provided. Luckily, Microsoft left the application in the operating system. It’s just more difficult to get to.

To bring up Local Security Policy in Windows 8 and 8.1, follow these steps:

From the Desktop or the Metro Start windows, press Windows + R to open the Run dialog box.

Type secpol.msc and press Enter.

002-Editing-Local-Security-Policy-in-Windows-8

That’s it! You’ll see the Local Security Policy application in a moment.

003-Editing-Local-Security-Policy-in-Windows-8

Enjoy!

Mike Danseglio – CISSP, MCSE, and CEH

Mike Danseglio teaches IT Security Training, Windows, System Center and Windows Server 2012 classes at Interface Technical Training. His classes are available in Phoenix, AZ and online with RemoteLive™.

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Windows 8.1 Exams Retirement Announced https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/windows-8-1-exams-retirement-announced/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/windows-8-1-exams-retirement-announced/#respond Wed, 28 Oct 2015 21:10:09 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=21749 Microsoft has announced due to the overlap of the Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 exams, the Windows 8.1 upgrade exams 70-689 Upgrading Your Skills to MCSA Windows 8 and the 70-692 Upgrading Your Windows XP Skills to MCSA Windows 8.1 will retire on 31 January 2016. . As well as the Windows 8.1 MCSA exams … Continue reading Windows 8.1 Exams Retirement Announced

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Microsoft has announced due to the overlap of the Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 exams, the Windows 8.1 upgrade exams 70-689 Upgrading Your Skills to MCSA Windows 8 and the 70-692 Upgrading Your Windows XP Skills to MCSA Windows 8.1 will retire on 31 January 2016. . As well as the Windows 8.1 MCSA exams 70-687 Configuring Windows 8.1 and 70-688 Supporting Windows 8.1 will retire on 31 July 2016.

The first Windows 10 exam, 70-697 Configuring Windows Devices is about to finish its beta phase and should be release soon. The second exam 70-698 Planning for and Managing Windows Devices is nearing completion.

For instructor-led Windows Server 2012 Training, see our class schedule.

Until next time, RIDE SAFE!

Rick Trader
Windows Server Instructor – Interface Technical Training
Phoenix, AZ

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Customizing Handwriting Recognition in Windows 8 and 8.1 https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/customizing-handwriting-recognition-in-windows-8-and-8-1/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/customizing-handwriting-recognition-in-windows-8-and-8-1/#respond Mon, 26 Oct 2015 16:25:50 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=21739 I recently picked up a Microsoft Surface Pro 3. I’ve always liked tablet computers and this looked to be a great opportunity to test one out in advance of Windows 10 launching. For instructor-led Windows training see our class schedule.  One of my favorite things to do with a tablet computer is writing notes by … Continue reading Customizing Handwriting Recognition in Windows 8 and 8.1

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I recently picked up a Microsoft Surface Pro 3. I’ve always liked tablet computers and this looked to be a great opportunity to test one out in advance of Windows 10 launching.

For instructor-led Windows training see our class schedule

One of my favorite things to do with a tablet computer is writing notes by hand. It really comes in handy (no pun intended) when typing would be rude or when there’s not enough space for a keyboard. So I took out the Microsoft Surface Pen, paired it to the Surface via Bluetooth, and began writing.

Sadly, my penmanship isn’t great. Windows 8.1 had lots of trouble figuring out what I was writing. I knew that Microsoft has included handwriting training since Windows 7 because I demonstrated it during the WinHEC 2008 conference. So I opened up Control Panel and… couldn’t find it.

Is handwriting training gone in Windows 8.1? No. It’s still there. And this is how you find and launch it.

How to Launch Handwriting Personalization

Open the desktop version of Control Panel. There are several ways to do this, I prefer to press Windows + R, and then I type control and press Enter. This shows the full Control Panel. For the next step you must ensure that the view is set to either Large Icons or Small Icons.

001a-Customizing-Handwriting-Recognition-in-Windows-8-8-1

Next, click the Language icon.

002-Customizing-Handwriting-Recognition-in-Windows-8-8-1

The Languages applet shows the installed languages, allows installation of additional languages, and allows customization for all installed languages. Click Options to modify the desired language (in my case, English (United States) is the only language installed). This shows the Language Options dialog.

003-Customizing-Handwriting-Recognition-in-Windows-8-8-1

Aha! That’s where the little devil is hiding. Now click Personalize handwriting recognition to open the dialog box you’ve been looking for.

004-Customizing-Handwriting-Recognition-in-Windows-8-8-1

Success! You now have your choice of two options:

Teach the recognizer your handwriting style is the training feature. This option will present a large number of phrases and sentences for you to write, and Windows compares your writing to the known text to learn how you form letters, numbers, words, punctuation, etc.

Target specific recognition errors to fix specific recognition errors. This is not full-on training and is best used after initial training to correct very specific recognition errors.

I recommend you start by teaching the recognizer how you write. It will take a while – typically Windows gives you 50 sentences to start before it performs its analysis. You can save your progress at any point and continue later, so make some time, get comfy, and write away!

Enjoy!

Mike Danseglio – CISSP, MCSE, and CEH

Mike Danseglio teaches IT Security Training, Windows, System Center and Windows Server 2012 classes at Interface Technical Training. His classes are available in Phoenix, AZ and online with RemoteLive™.

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Control Panel Command Line Tools https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/control-panel-command-line-tools/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/control-panel-command-line-tools/#respond Mon, 05 Oct 2015 15:30:23 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=21612 While looking up some modifications to command lines tools, specifically those associated with launching control panel applets, I came across a couple of comprehensive or well written websites.  I bookmarked then as future resources and believe you might find them useful as well. For instructor-led training, see our complete course schedule.  The first is a … Continue reading Control Panel Command Line Tools

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While looking up some modifications to command lines tools, specifically those associated with launching control panel applets, I came across a couple of comprehensive or well written websites.  I bookmarked then as future resources and believe you might find them useful as well.

For instructor-led training, see our complete course schedule

The first is a comparison of XP, Vista, Windows 7 and Windows 8 control panel tools compiled by Tim Fisher. Tim’s list is comprehensive, though incomplete.

Rick Trader is updating a blog to support access to (forgotten) administrative passwords when rebuilding or resetting a system. Expanding the list of tools he reviewed, you also need to consider:

Nusrmgr.cpl On XP for access to control panel User Accounts
Control nsusrmgr.cpl For accessing User Accounts on Windows 7 or Windows 8.1
Lusrmgr.msc Local users and groups on Windows 7 or Windows 8/8.1
Netplwiz From the search line for Local User Account management and password reset

How-to-Geek also reminds us about the hidden User Accounts Utility – Userpasswords2 that enables additional administrative capabilities for account management. You launch Userpasswords2 by typing Control Userpasswords2 in an elevated command prompt window. The How-To Geek article also references hacks for adding the tool to Windows XP, Vista, or Windows 7 Control panels.

Darrill Gibson, author of Windows 7 Portable Command Guide: MCTS 70-680, 70-685 and 70-686 wrote an abbreviated overview that might assist with launching control panel applets from an elevated command prompt.  The value of Darrill’s article and book is their focus on some of the command line tools that you need to know to pass the Windows 7 MCTS/MCITP exams.

The list of Control Panel command line tools that I provide as a supplemental handout for my A+ students follows.  While far from comprehensive, it provides sufficient information to assist students through the current CompTIA 220-801 and 220-802 exams.

Control Panel Applications from Command Line

You can access these applets by hitting the Windows Key+R and typing Control and the app that you want. Example:  control hdwwiz.cpl

(Note: Windows Key +R is the RUN command)

Control Panel T ool Command
Accessibility Options control access.cpl
Add New Hardware control sysdm.cpl add new hardware
Add/Remove Programs control appwiz.cpl
Date/Time Properties control timedate.cpl
Display Properties control desk.cpl
FindFast control findfast.cpl
Fonts Folder control fonts
Internet Properties control inetcpl.cpl
Joystick Properties control joy.cpl
Keyboard Properties control main.cpl keyboard
Microsoft Exchangeor Windows Messaging control mlcfg32.cpl
Microsoft Mail Post Office control wgpocpl.cpl
Modem Properties control modem.cpl
Mouse Properties control main.cpl
Multimedia Properties control mmsys.cpl
Network Properties control netcpl.cplNOTE: In Windows NT 4.0, Networkproperties is Ncpa.cpl, not Netcpl.cpl
Password Properties control password.cpl
PC Card control main.cpl pc card (PCMCIA)
Power Management (Windows 95) control main.cpl power
Power Management (Windows 98) control powercfg.cpl
Printers Folder control printers
Regional Settings control intl.cpl
Scanners and Cameras control sticpl.cpl
Sound Properties control mmsys.cpl sounds
System Properties control sysdm.cpl

 

Microsoft also provides several platform specific resources, including.

Remember that many control panel applets are considered features in Windows 7 and Windows 8/8.1.  You may not find or be able to use the corresponding .cpl file until or unless you enable the feature by Turning Windows Features On or Off through the control panel.  You may also enable Windows 7 or Windows 8 Control Panel features from the Command line tool using DISM.

Don’t forget to consider PowerShell tools Show-ControlPanelItem and Get-ControlPanelItem to manage many of your control panel features and their settings.  These cmdlets are new to PowerShell 3.0.   There are a wealth of articles guiding the use of the new cmdlets, including an article with screen shots by Aman Dhally that ventures a little further than mentioning their use.

You should now be able to start your explorations.

I look forward to seeing you in the classroom, or online!

Steven Fullmer
Interface Technical Training Staff Instructor

Steve teaches PMP: Project Management Fundamentals and Professional Certification, Windows 10Windows 7, Windows 8.1 and CompTIA classes in Phoenix, Arizona.

 

 

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How to determine if a specific KB Windows update has been applied to your computer https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/how-to-determine-if-a-specific-kb-windows-update-has-been-applied-to-your-computer/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/how-to-determine-if-a-specific-kb-windows-update-has-been-applied-to-your-computer/#comments Mon, 21 Sep 2015 19:13:25 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=21547 There may be times when troubleshooting or preparing for an upgrade to determine if a specific KB Windows Update has been applied to a computer. For instructor-led training, see our Windows 10 classes. For more, see our complete course schedule. There a couple of solutions. First use the Windows Update tool. Launch Windows Update Click … Continue reading How to determine if a specific KB Windows update has been applied to your computer

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There may be times when troubleshooting or preparing for an upgrade to determine if a specific KB Windows Update has been applied to a computer.

For instructor-led training, see our Windows 10 classes. For more, see our complete course schedule.

There a couple of solutions.

First use the Windows Update tool.

  1. Launch Windows Update
  2. Click on View your update history

001-kb-update

  1. Search the update history to see if the desired update is installed.

002-kb-update

Second way – Use DISM.exe.

  1. Launch the Command Prompt with administrative privileges.

003-kb-update

  1. By typing the following command within your elevated command prompt will get a list of all updates that have been applied to your computer. Search the update history to see if the desired update is installed:

Type dism /online /get-packages

 004-kb-update

  1. You can check for a specific update by piping the output to FINDSTR. Typing the following command within your elevated command prompt will get a list of a specific update has been applied to your computer:

Type dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB2894856  (KB is case sensitive)

Note:  (Replace the KB number with whichever update you are looking for.)   If the update exists there will be a response if not a command prompt will be returned.

005-kb-update

Third way – Use SYSTEMINFO.exe.

  1. Launch the Command Prompt with administrative privileges.

006-kb-update

  1. By typing the following command within your elevated command prompt will get a list of all updates that have been applied to your computer. Search the update history to see if the desired update is installed:

Type SYSTEMINFO.exe

 007-kb-update

  1. You can check for a specific update by piping the output to FINDSTR. Typing the following command within your elevated command prompt will get a list of a specific update has been applied to your computer:

Type SYTEMINFO.exe | findstr KB2894856  (KB is case sensitive)

Note:  (Replace the KB number with whichever update you are looking for.)   If the update exists there will be a response if not a command prompt will be returned.

008-kb-update

Hope this helps you determine if a specific update is installed on your computer or not.

Until next time, RIDE SAFE!

Rick Trader
Windows Server Instructor – Interface Technical Training
Phoenix, AZ

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How to run virtual machines on Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/how-to-run-virtual-machines-on-windows-8-and-windows-8-1/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/how-to-run-virtual-machines-on-windows-8-and-windows-8-1/#respond Wed, 02 Sep 2015 19:19:50 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=21476 Both Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 (x64) Professional and Enterprise have the ability to create and run virtual machines after installing the Hyper-V role.  This role is commonly referred to as Windows 8 / 8.1 Client Hyper-V.  This is the same Hypervisor that is available in Windows Server 2012 R2 with the capabilities of creating … Continue reading How to run virtual machines on Windows 8 and Windows 8.1

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Both Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 (x64) Professional and Enterprise have the ability to create and run virtual machines after installing the Hyper-V role.  This role is commonly referred to as Windows 8 / 8.1 Client Hyper-V.  This is the same Hypervisor that is available in Windows Server 2012 R2 with the capabilities of creating both Generation 1 and Generation 2 Virtual Machines.

To enable Hyper‑V on Windows 8 or 8.1

  1. In Control Panel, tap or click Programs, and then tap or click Programs and Features.
  2. Tap or click Turn Windows Features on or off.
  3. Select Hyper‑V, tap or click OK, and then tap or click Close.
  4. Shut down your PC, and then restart it.

Once the Client Hyper-V role is installed you will have all the capabilities of the Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2 versions with a few minor exceptions.  If you need to use any of the following capabilities you will need to use a server version of Hyper-V.  The following is a list of those capabilities the client version will not support:

  • Live Migrations
  • Hyper-V Replica
  • Virtual Fibre Channel
  • 32-bit SR-IOV networking
  • Remote FX
  • Shared .VHDX

Once installed the client looks and feels just like its big brother does running on a server.

Until Next time, Ride Safe!

For instructor-led Windows 7 training, see our course schedule.

Rick Trader
Windows Server Instructor – Interface Technical Training
Phoenix, AZ

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