How to determine if a specific KB Windows update has been applied to your computer

Home > Blogs > Windows 7 > How to determine if a specific KB Windows update has been applied to your computer

How to determine if a specific KB Windows update has been applied to your computer

Like This Blog 8Rick Trader
Added by September 21, 2015

There may be times when troubleshooting or preparing for an upgrade to determine if a specific KB Windows Update has been applied to a computer.

For instructor-led training, see our Windows 10 classes. For more, see our complete course schedule.

There a couple of solutions.

First use the Windows Update tool.

  1. Launch Windows Update
  2. Click on View your update history

001-kb-update

  1. Search the update history to see if the desired update is installed.

002-kb-update

Second way – Use DISM.exe.

  1. Launch the Command Prompt with administrative privileges.

003-kb-update

  1. By typing the following command within your elevated command prompt will get a list of all updates that have been applied to your computer. Search the update history to see if the desired update is installed:

Type dism /online /get-packages

 004-kb-update

  1. You can check for a specific update by piping the output to FINDSTR. Typing the following command within your elevated command prompt will get a list of a specific update has been applied to your computer:
You may also like:  How to Configure your Network Location in Windows 8 and Windows 8.1

Type dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB2894856  (KB is case sensitive)

Note:  (Replace the KB number with whichever update you are looking for.)   If the update exists there will be a response if not a command prompt will be returned.

005-kb-update

Third way – Use SYSTEMINFO.exe.

  1. Launch the Command Prompt with administrative privileges.

006-kb-update

  1. By typing the following command within your elevated command prompt will get a list of all updates that have been applied to your computer. Search the update history to see if the desired update is installed:

Type SYSTEMINFO.exe

 007-kb-update

  1. You can check for a specific update by piping the output to FINDSTR. Typing the following command within your elevated command prompt will get a list of a specific update has been applied to your computer:

Type SYTEMINFO.exe | findstr KB2894856  (KB is case sensitive)

Note:  (Replace the KB number with whichever update you are looking for.)   If the update exists there will be a response if not a command prompt will be returned.

You may also like:  How to Retrieve Operating System Information Using a Command Line

008-kb-update

Hope this helps you determine if a specific update is installed on your computer or not.

Until next time, RIDE SAFE!

Rick Trader
Windows Server Instructor – Interface Technical Training
Phoenix, AZ

Videos You May Like

Windows 10 Managing, Deploying and Configuring – December 2, 2015

0 165 1

In this recorded Windows 10 training webinar from December 2, 2015, Windows Server instructor Rick Trader presents the deployment and management of Windows 10 Enterprise and the new Provisioning capability in Windows 10. Learn how to manage Windows 10 deployments using System Center Configuration Manager, Mobile Device Management and Intune. Also included in his presentation … Continue reading Windows 10 Managing, Deploying and Configuring – December 2, 2015

Using WHOAMI.exe to troubleshoot NTFS Permissions in Windows

0 22 0

In this training video, learn how to use WHOAMI.exe to use to troubleshoot user NTFS permissions in Microsoft Windows and Windows Server.

Detailed Forensic Investigation of Malware Infections – April 21, 2015

2 137 1

In this IT Security training video, Security expert Mike Danseglio (CISSP / CEH) will perform several malware investigations including rootkits, botnets, viruses, and browser toolbars.

Write a Comment

See what people are saying...

  1. Larry Sanchez

    I tried all 3 methods and all three worked, but THEY DIDN’T! I’m trying to ferret out and remove that freakin KB971033 file! I removed it before and hid the file, in order to try to prevent its re-installation. Didn’t work and it’s back badgering me about having a counterfit Windows 7 version, even though I know better. This time, though, the KB file is BURIED somethow! I see it, when I go to Windows Update and get a list of everything that was installed. It’s there and it shows the file was successfully installed 02/16/2018. (I only THOUGHT I had removed it.) When I go to “Installed Updates” so that I can try to REMOVE the update, IT’S NOT THERE! In trying the 3 versions you show for uncovering the file, NONE of them show that it is installed. But, Windows Update says it was INSTALLED and, apparently, its still alive and kicking. Any thoughts on this?

  2. temp

    you have misspelled in
    SYTEMINFO.exe | findstr KB2894856

    It should be
    SYSTEMINFO.exe | findstr KB2894856

  3. Carlos

    thank you very much, it worked like a charm in windows server 2008 R2

  4. Fra Jules

    Hi! We have the same problem like Buddy Shipley. We can not find the MS17-010. It’s not listed in “Programs and Features” – > Installed Updates but it’s listed as installed in “Windows Updates” -> View update History.

  5. Buddy Shipley

    I cannot get this to work: dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB#######
    I’ve tried with & without quotes around the KB#. I even tried searching for KB#s that I know are installed.

    I’m trying to write a simple batch to run at an elevated command prompt to determine that MS17-010 is present.

    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4012212
    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4012213
    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4012214
    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4012215
    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4012216
    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4012217
    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4012219
    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4012220
    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4012598
    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4012606
    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4013198
    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4013429
    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4015217
    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4015438
    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4015549
    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4015550
    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4015551
    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4015551
    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4016635
    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4018466
    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4019215
    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4019216
    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4019263
    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4019264
    dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4019472

    .

  6. justen

    cmd line and, more specifically, findstr is not case sensitive. Great article though, the dism command worked around an issue I was having with systeminfo. Thanks!

  7. Bruce

    The two command prompt methods, dism and systeminfo, did not seem to work when I tried to find an Office 2010 update. Maybe these only work for Windows System updates?

  8. dag

    SYTEMINFO.exe

    you missed s

Share your thoughts...

Please fill out the comment form below to post a reply.