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  • How to determine if a specific KB Windows update has been applied to your computer

    There may be times when troubleshooting or preparing for an upgrade to determine if a specific KB Windows Update has been applied to a computer.

    For instructor-led training, see our Windows 10 classes. For more, see our complete course schedule.

    There a couple of solutions.

    First use the Windows Update tool.

    1. Launch Windows Update
    2. Click on View your update history

    001-kb-update

    1. Search the update history to see if the desired update is installed.

    002-kb-update

    Second way – Use DISM.exe.

    1. Launch the Command Prompt with administrative privileges.

    003-kb-update

    1. By typing the following command within your elevated command prompt will get a list of all updates that have been applied to your computer. Search the update history to see if the desired update is installed:

    Type dism /online /get-packages

     004-kb-update

    1. You can check for a specific update by piping the output to FINDSTR. Typing the following command within your elevated command prompt will get a list of a specific update has been applied to your computer:
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    Type dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB2894856  (KB is case sensitive)

    Note:  (Replace the KB number with whichever update you are looking for.)   If the update exists there will be a response if not a command prompt will be returned.

    005-kb-update

    Third way – Use SYSTEMINFO.exe.

    1. Launch the Command Prompt with administrative privileges.

    006-kb-update

    1. By typing the following command within your elevated command prompt will get a list of all updates that have been applied to your computer. Search the update history to see if the desired update is installed:

    Type SYSTEMINFO.exe

     007-kb-update

    1. You can check for a specific update by piping the output to FINDSTR. Typing the following command within your elevated command prompt will get a list of a specific update has been applied to your computer:

    Type SYTEMINFO.exe | findstr KB2894856  (KB is case sensitive)

    Note:  (Replace the KB number with whichever update you are looking for.)   If the update exists there will be a response if not a command prompt will be returned.

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    008-kb-update

    Hope this helps you determine if a specific update is installed on your computer or not.

    Until next time, RIDE SAFE!

    Rick Trader
    Windows Server Instructor – Interface Technical Training
    Phoenix, AZ

    See what people are saying...

    1. Carlos

      thank you very much, it worked like a charm in windows server 2008 R2

    2. Fra Jules

      Hi! We have the same problem like Buddy Shipley. We can not find the MS17-010. It’s not listed in “Programs and Features” – > Installed Updates but it’s listed as installed in “Windows Updates” -> View update History.

    3. Buddy Shipley

      I cannot get this to work: dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB#######
      I’ve tried with & without quotes around the KB#. I even tried searching for KB#s that I know are installed.

      I’m trying to write a simple batch to run at an elevated command prompt to determine that MS17-010 is present.

      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4012212
      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4012213
      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4012214
      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4012215
      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4012216
      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4012217
      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4012219
      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4012220
      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4012598
      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4012606
      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4013198
      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4013429
      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4015217
      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4015438
      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4015549
      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4015550
      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4015551
      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4015551
      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4016635
      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4018466
      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4019215
      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4019216
      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4019263
      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4019264
      dism /online /get-packages | findstr KB4019472

      .

    4. justen

      cmd line and, more specifically, findstr is not case sensitive. Great article though, the dism command worked around an issue I was having with systeminfo. Thanks!

    5. Bruce

      The two command prompt methods, dism and systeminfo, did not seem to work when I tried to find an Office 2010 update. Maybe these only work for Windows System updates?

    6. dag

      SYTEMINFO.exe

      you missed s

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