Web Development – Interface Technical Training https://www.interfacett.com Wed, 21 Jun 2017 19:26:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Running Java Apps in Microsoft Edge on Windows 10 https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/running-java-apps-in-microsoft-edge-on-windows-10/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/running-java-apps-in-microsoft-edge-on-windows-10/#respond Mon, 04 Jan 2016 16:29:03 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=22203 Microsoft Edge is the new, built from the ground up browser included in Windows 10. It’s quite impressive actually. It’s fast, it launches cleanly, and it has tons of security improvements. One of the biggest security improvements is a dual-edged sword that you should know about. Microsoft Edge only runs add-ins and extensions that are … Continue reading Running Java Apps in Microsoft Edge on Windows 10

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Microsoft Edge is the new, built from the ground up browser included in Windows 10. It’s quite impressive actually. It’s fast, it launches cleanly, and it has tons of security improvements. One of the biggest security improvements is a dual-edged sword that you should know about.

Microsoft Edge only runs add-ins and extensions that are digitally signed by, and come from, Microsoft. No third-party extensions are allowed in Microsoft Edge.

What is Java? Well, generically it’s an application platform. To Microsoft Edge, it’s a non-Microsoft extension. Therefore, Java will not run within Microsoft Edge. Even if you download Java and install it, apps will still not run inside Microsoft Edge.

How do you get around that and make Java apps work? Simple. Use Internet Explorer 11, the second browser that Microsoft quietly built into Windows 10. IE11 is included in Windows 10 for this kind of scenario where unsupported or legacy features are still required. You can easily find it by clicking the Windows flag (the new Start button) and typing Internet Explorer. If you need to use it more often, simply pin it to the taskbar.

Mike Danseglio – CISSP, MCSE, and CEH

Mike Danseglio teaches IT Security Training, Windows, System Center and Windows Server 2012 classes at Interface Technical Training. His classes are available in Phoenix, AZ and online with RemoteLive™.

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ECMAScript 6 (ES6) – The Future Look of JavaScript for C# Developers https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/ecmascript-6-es6-the-future-look-of-javascript-for-c-developers/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/ecmascript-6-es6-the-future-look-of-javascript-for-c-developers/#respond Thu, 21 May 2015 23:08:14 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=20621 This is an excerpt of a webinar by Dan Wahlin – JavaScript for C# Developers that was conducted at Interface Technical Training on September 14, 2014. Watch the entire webinar at JavaScript for C# Developers webinar with Dan Wahlin Dan Wahlin teaches Web Development and .NET Visual Studio classes at Interface Technical Training. Dan’s instructor-led training classes include … Continue reading ECMAScript 6 (ES6) – The Future Look of JavaScript for C# Developers

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This is an excerpt of a webinar by Dan Wahlin – JavaScript for C# Developers that was conducted at Interface Technical Training on September 14, 2014.

JavaScript Webinar link image of Dan Wahlin at Interface Technical Training

Watch the entire webinar at JavaScript for C# Developers webinar with Dan Wahlin

Dan Wahlin teaches Web Development and .NET Visual Studio classes at Interface Technical Training. Dan’s instructor-led training classes include JavaScript, AngularJS, jQuery, Node.js, HTML5, ASP.NET MVC, C#, and C# design patterns. They can be attended in Phoenix, AZ or online with Remote Live.


Webinar Transcription:

If you’re currently doing development work on the Server Side and doing a lot of C# every day. Maybe you’re doing just desktop apps and now you’re being asked to move into the web world. I’d love to say that learning JavaScript is going to solve all the world’s problems but, in fact, JavaScript is only one part of the picture.

I’ll mention quickly some of the other related technologies that you’ll also be using along with JavaScript if you’re going to be building web apps with it.

JavaScript – Related Technologies

HTML

DOM Interaction

CSS Manipulation

When HTML first gets loaded into memory in the browser, it gets put into the Document Object Model or (DOM).

Often times, we’ll be writing JavaScript to interact with the page for validation purposes. Maybe you want to handle the events of the user clicking a button or selecting a drop down etc..

Also, you’ll often manipulate CSS or CSS Classes. If you haven’t done much with CSS, this would be our styles in our web pages. Our colors, fonts, etc… JavaScript’s also used a lot of cases such as  when a user moves the mouse over a row on a grid an action is started. You want to change that color to green or something. That’s also going to require some knowledge of working with CSS and the DOM and things along those lines. Now, the good news is, although we can write what we call vanilla JavaScript. Which is just JavaScript supported by all the browsers.

You can use libraries out there like, KnockOutJS [http://knockoutjs.com/ ] which is a data binding library. jQuery [https://jquery.com/ ] is very, very popular for DOM manipulation, manipulating what’s in the web page. What it will do is give you a kind of solid support structure that will make things work better cross browser.

ECMAScript 6 (ES6) – The Future Look of C#-ish

We’ve covered some of the similarities between JavaScript and C#. We’ve covered several of the differences between JavaScript and C# and even some related technologies.

The good news is the direction of JavaScript is looking more and more like C# every day. ECMAScript 6 is coming.

There’s already browsers, Mozilla Firefox for instance is supporting several of the new features already ECMAScript 6 support in Mozilla. Chrome supports a few of them. Then there is even some other options you can do with this I talk about. Like Traceur which is a kind of a build process for JavaScript that I’ll mention.

The future actually looks pretty bright. There is a lot of cool stuff coming out that’s going to make JavaScript a lot better than what we currently have today. Although, with functions you can emulate classes, which you will see in this post.

We’re actually are going to have full support for classes which is really nice to have. Inheritance will also be greatly simplified and there is a numerous other features that are going to be available.

Here’s a link of a Gethub site Browser Support:

This will actually allow you to check which browsers are supporting this particular ES6 feature. You’re going to find that most of the browsers don’t support ES6 very well now because it’s in its early release lifecycle.

Here are some of the features of ECMAScript 6.

Key ES6 (ECMAScript 6) Features

Modules

Classes

Block Scope

Destructuring

Arrow Functions

Default Parameters

Generators

More…

Modules:

We’re going to have support for modules. This will allow us to build more modular code like namespaces, but also the ability to load modules dynamically. Almost like adding a reference to an assembly in C#, but little bit different process.

Classes:

We’re going to have support for classes including inheritance like we’re used to in C#. It’s going to look much more like that. Now, under the covers we’re still going to have the prototypical inheritance I mentioned earlier, but this will be a really nice feature to have.

Block Scope:

Block scope with the let keyword will be provided. That’s going to be awesome, because if you come from C# you’re used to three levels of scope and it’s a little bit tricky when you start doing JavaScript.

Destructuring:

They have a way to destructure and work with objects and arrays which is very interesting.

Arrow Functions:

Arrow functions are actually lambdas. In C#, we’ve had lambdas for several years now (one of my favorite features actually.) We now have support for anonymous functions, a really compact syntax which is going to be pretty cool. It looks exactly like lambdas. In fact, we’ll show an example in this post.

Default Parameters:

You’re going to be able to have default parameter values. As a parameter is passed in, you want to give it a default value incase it’s not passed in. We can do that now in C# with optional parameters. We can now do that with ECMAScript 6 with what they call Default Parameters.

Generators:

Generators are related to the yield of C#. It relates to iterators and how we can actually iterate through a series of steps. This gets a little more advanced, but you can do some pretty cool stuff with that.

More…:

Then there is a whole bunch more. If you want to see all the features, visit:  http://kangax.github.io/compat-table/es6/.

ECMAScript 6 (ES6) – The Future Look of JavaScript for C# Developers

This is mainly geared to show you the browsers that support it and that don’t, but there’s a lot of great stuff that’s coming out in ECMAScript 6.

Demo Slide ECMAScript 6 (ES6) – The Future Look of JavaScript for C# Developers

Here’s a quick demo of some of the ECMAScript 6 features.

I’ll start in section 4. Let’s start with something pretty simple, that if you do lambdas you’ll be familiar with.

Lamnda Code Example ECMAScript 6 (ES6) – The Future Look of JavaScript for C# Developers

You’ll see in Microsoft Visual Studio as I show this a lot of red lines are going to display.

Visual Studio JavaScript ECMAScript 6 (ES6) – The Future Look of JavaScript for C# Developers

That’s just because it doesn’t quite support without some plugging anyway, the ECMAScript 6 syntax in a JavaScript file. You’ll notice that we have this, myLogger, and we have this parameter, a lambda and then what to do.

005-Visual-Studio-JavaScript-lamnda-ES6-ECMAScript-6

Now when my logger is called, we can pass the parameter which is just like in C# that will be passed in as the message here. Then we’re going to write that out to the console. That would be an example of an arrow function that you can work with.

That’s going to be a great feature that will really clean up JavaScript code over what we have today.

Classes:

I mentioned that we have support for classes. Here is an example of ECMAScript 6 class for JavaScript.

Visual Studio Functions ECMAScript 6 (ES6) – The Future Look of JavaScript for C# Developers

You notice that they actually have the class keyword highlighted.

There is a way to emulate this with JavaScript patterns out there like the Revealing Module Pattern or the Revealing Prototype Pattern.

Now we’re going to have full support for classes, you’ll notice there are constructors here.

Constructor ECMAScript 6 (ES6) – The Future Look of JavaScript for C# Developers

Functions are much more compact.

Functions - ECMAScript 6 (ES6) – The Future Look of JavaScript for C# Developers

You’ll see that we don’t even have to put the function keyword. We can just put the name of the function very nice.

Then moving on down here I have a logger that extends which is their way of doing inheritance, the base log.

Logger Functions ECMAScript 6 (ES6) – The Future Look of JavaScript for C# Developers

Then I can even call into the Base Class. Super it’s actually very analogous to Java, but it’d be like base in C#.

We’re going to pass whatever log name is up into the base class. Then when we call right line we’re actually going to call the base classes’ log which is the one right up here.

010l-function-JavaScript-lamnda-ES6-ECMAScript-6

This will really clean up the code and make it much easier to work with.

Finally, this one’s a very simple feature and it’s a big deal.

011-function-JavaScript-lamnda-ES6-ECMAScript-6

Earlier I demonstrated that if we have a stand‑alone loop, and if we had like age defined, depending on how it’s defined and where it’s defined, if it’s in just a block. We don’t have block level scope, so you could step on global variables that are in like a class accidentally. That’s a source of bugs for sure.

You’ll see the inclusion of the let keyword.

Now if I try to ride it out and run this, we’ll actually get an error.

012-function-JavaScript-lamnda-ES6-ECMAScript-6

It’s going to say that (i) is out of scope, and that’s because it was defined at the block level scope. That’s what the let keyword is going to do.

There is many other features I could show you, but I’m actually going to run this right now.

014-function-JavaScript-lamnda-ES6-ECMAScript-6

It’s going to work, and this will work in any browser actually and I’ll tell why in a moment.

Browser Function ECMAScript 6 (ES6) – The Future Look of JavaScript for C# Developers

I am going to run off to the little debugging console here.

016-browser-function-JavaScript-lamnda-ES6-ECMAScript-6

You’ll see that we have testing out the arrow function.

017-browser-function-JavaScript-lamnda-ES6-ECMAScript-6

(i) is out of scope. We called the logger with the ES6 class that I showed in the base class, and that’s all working. You might ask the question. What is this magic? How is this working? The answer is, it wouldn’t work by default, but there are some different libraries out there. One is called Traceur.

Traceur JavaScript Lamnda

I actually have a little tool I’m running, and I’ve already run it to generate some code. This is called GULP. [http://gulpjs.com/] We’re not going to have time to get into this one, but it’s a JavaScript based task tool and you can run different built tasks.

What I am doing is every JavaScript file in the folder I just showed earlier that’s an ES6 JavaScript file.

019-tracer-JavaScript-lamnda-ES6-ECMAScript-6

I am compiling those using this Traceur. I mentioned JavaScript doesn’t have a compiler. This is kind of a reverse compiler.

What Traceur will do is let you write modern code, and then it reverse-engineers it back into ECMAScript 5. Which is what today’s browsers support type of code.

020-tracer-JavaScript-lamnda-ES6-ECMAScript-6

In scripts, you’ll see I have a compiled folder. With arrowFunctions.js script, my logger.js and my scopeAndlet.js.

You’ll see this is what actually looks like to make it work cross browser.

Traceur ECMAScript 6 (ES6) – The Future Look of JavaScript for C# Developers

The cool thing is this will work cross browser. I just included one little Traceur script in my web page, and I’m able to start writing modern ECMAScript 6 with classes and all of that code, but have it work in the older browsers.

This is something that’s still early. I do know of some companies that are going this route or a lot of companies are doing. If they want this but don’t want to use this kind of reverse compilers, they’ll use something like Typescript [http://www.typescriptlang.org/]. A lot of cool stuff you can do there.

Summary:

  • Many C# concepts carry over to JavaScript
  • By using JavaScript you can push more functionality to the client
  • JavaScript isn’t strongly-typed like C#
  • Be careful to type issues and equality checks in JavaScript

Many of the same concepts you can see carry over. There are as I mentioned earlier a few sharks in the water, you have to watch out for though.

There’s a lot of functionality that you can push down to the client, and really give that user more of a desktop‑like experience is the way I like to word it. JavaScript is not strongly typed as you saw. There’s a very limited set of types we talked about.

There are a few issues you have to watch out for like the scope, the equality checks with the triple equals versus the double (= = =) vs (= =).

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JavaScript for C# Developers – Differences between JavaScript Dynamic Syntax and C# https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/javascript-for-c-developers-the-difference-between-javascript-dynamic-syntax-and-c/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/javascript-for-c-developers-the-difference-between-javascript-dynamic-syntax-and-c/#comments Thu, 14 May 2015 21:00:24 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=20533 This is an excerpt of a webinar by Dan Wahlin – JavaScript for C# Developers that was conducted at Interface Technical Training on September 14, 2014. You can watch the entire webinar at JavaScript for C# Developers webinar Dan Wahlin teaches Web Development and .NET Visual Studio classes at Interface Technical Dan’s instructor-led training includes … Continue reading JavaScript for C# Developers – Differences between JavaScript Dynamic Syntax and C#

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This is an excerpt of a webinar by Dan Wahlin – JavaScript for C# Developers that was conducted at Interface Technical Training on September 14, 2014.

JavaScript Webinar link image of Dan Wahlin at Interface Technical Training

You can watch the entire webinar at JavaScript for C# Developers webinar

Dan Wahlin teaches Web Development and .NET Visual Studio classes at Interface Technical

Dan’s instructor-led training includes JavaScript, AngularJS, jQuery, Node.js, HTML5, ASP.NET MVC, C#, and C# design patterns. Dan’s classes can be attended in Phoenix, AZ or online with Remote Live.


Webinar Transcription:

Now we talked about some of the key similarities of C# and JavaScript Key concepts of C# and JavaScript Syntax and you can see some of the fundamental concepts like Methods, Loops, Conditionals, and Variables. They are very similar between languages. If you currently work in C#, you are not going to struggle learning the syntax of JavaScript.

In this post, I’ll demonstrate some differences in JavaScript and C# where people tend to struggle.

Key Defenses between JavaScript and C#

  • JavaScript is a dynamic language!
  • Variables are not strongly-typed
  • No native support for namespaces and classes (until ES6)
  • Only 2 levels of variable scope (until ES6)
  • Equality comparisons can be tricky
  • Functions are objects by default

First, JavaScript is a totally dynamic language. There is no compiler which is a little bit of a bummer if you’re used to getting the error notifications as you compile. You have to go and do what I did earlier Key concepts of C# and JavaScript Syntax and go into Chrome Developer Tools or IE Developer Tools, to figure out any JavaScript errors.

Another way that it JavaScript differs from C# is with JavaScript, you don’t have the same types of system. In fact, you don’t have types like int, float or double. You do have the concept of them, but you don’t have the same exact data types.

In fact, you always use “var,” as you’re defining your variables. Whereas with C#, we’re used to strongly typed applications. Also, there’s absolutely no native support currently for Namespaces or Classes. That’s a little bit of a bummer, I will admit if you are coming in from the C# world, and we’re all used to building components if you will, classes that we can build into objects and re‑use those. JavaScript doesn’t need it, we have that through ECMAScript 5, which is the current version that most browsers support. But ECMAScript 6, which we’ll demonstrate in another post, does support that concept of reusable code. There are a lot of cool things you can do with ECMAScript 6.

There is only two levels of Variable Scope in JavaScript unlike three levels in C#. In C#, we’re used to the Class Level, and then we have the Method Level, then we have the Block Level. In JavaScript, by default, we have only two levels. (Until ECMAScript 6 is released)

You have variables that are global and you have function level. But if you define something like in the loop or if statement block, that is not actually a scoped definition. We can actually step on another definition that is outside of that to watch out in the JavaScript.

One of the biggest kind of “Sharks in the water,” is the Equality Comparisons. We’ll show some demos of the features later.

With C# you can use the double equals ( = = ) and it just automatically compares if they are equal or not. You’ll see in JavaScript that it gets a little tricky, and there’s something else that I am going to show you here that you can use. I’ll actually recommend you use when you are writing JavaScript.

Finally functions in the C#, don’t stand on their by themselves. Functions are always in classes or structures or something in C#. Well in JavaScript, functions can totally stand on their own. They’re actually objects. We will be talking about that as well.

JavaScript Data Types

Primary Types Composite Types Special Types
Sting Object Null
Number Array Undefined
Boolean

Let’s look and the data types, I mentioned that with JavaScript, we don’t have the different data types, or at least the robust nature of the data types we have in C#.

What we have is Primary, Composite and some Special Types.

Primary Types

The Primary Types are pretty familiar with as C# developers. We have strings. We do have numbers. But if you’ll notice, numbers are not really broken down into small, double, float, long, short and that type of thing. It is just the number. Primary types can have decimals, they can be whole numbers, that really just depends.

Boolean’s; We do have the ability to numerically evaluate a Boolean in JavaScript, unlike C# where true is true and false is false and there is no numeric equivalent per se.

Composite Types

In JavaScript, zero (0) is a false, a one (1) is true like several other developer languages. We also have object which is the base granddaddy of them all at the top of the hierarchy, very similar to C# in that regard.

We have Arrays, we showed list in a previous post Key concepts of C# and JavaScript Syntax.

Special Types

In Special Types we also have null, which everybody is used too in the C#. But we have this other one, it is called Undefined which we’ll look at later in this post.

Instead of just checking that something is Null, you’ll often check if it is null or is it Undefined. I will show you some short cut ways that we can actually do that.

Demo Image Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

In this demo we’ll look at a few of these key language differences in C# and how they manifest themselves in JavaScript.

First half, we start with Equality.

Equality in Visual Studio key language Differences Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

In C#, If I was to say, “Hey, does 5 equal 5 in this example?” You would probably say, “Of course not.” Well, in JavaScript it depends. With JavaScript, if I were to code like this:

Equality example in JavaScript Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

If age equals other age, with the normal double equals that we are used to for quality in C#. That actually will evaluate to true. That is a little bit shocking at first, if you’re brand new to JavaScript.

Well, that is not how it should be, at least in C#. But JavaScript will do some coercion. It will actually try to convert so that the data types can be compared. Technically 5 in quotes ‘ ‘  is equal to 5 here.

Equality Code Example language Differences Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

One other difference to point out is, if you’ll notice I used the single quotes ‘  ‘  like a character in C#.

In JavaScript, I can just as easily have done this with single or I could use double quotes “”.

Equality double quotes “” example code Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

Either way, it works. A lot of people (including myself) like the single quotes in JavaScript. That’s a pretty big jump if you are doing C# for the last five to ten years and are making the switch.

I mentioned undefined or null. You’ll notice address is not a signed value. If we actually to run this code right and we try to log the value of address, all it does is update the little bit of div at the top.

Equality Output div code language Differences Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

When I run this. It will show the output but the address is undefined, it doesn’t have a value.

Equality address undefined code example Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

It’s not null, it’s undefined.

Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

That’s also different compared to C# because we don’t have an undefined in that rule.

Street however is null, it is a null pointer in memory. I’ll run this little page.

C# Code view Differences Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

It’s not really impressive output, but you’ll see it’s true that quoted ‘5’ == 5

Equality Double = = and Triple equals === example Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

If we use the double quotes.

Here’s the trick I want to show you. It’s false if we use the triple equals ( = = = ).

Equality Triple Equal Example === Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

I don’t like languages that coheres my type to make them equal to each other. You want to stick with the triple equals in almost any app you do. It is little bit hard to remember that, if you are coming from C# world, but that’s a big deal.

Also, you’ll notice that address is not null, it’s actually returning that it’s undefined.

Undefined Value Example - Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

That’s because it hasn’t been assigned a value yet, vs street, you can see is null that will be used to in C#. That would be one example of some of the differences.

 

Scope

You” notice I have a variable in JavaScript called “age”.

Scope Example Code in Visual Studio - Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

If we do an Alert, the alert is like a message box that pops up. It is going to show it is 55. But notice in this loop, I am defining a new “age” and using that “age” to actually loop through and then riding out age.

Loopfunction JavaScript code example - Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

Well, that’s going to be function scope, so we have global scope and function scope here.

Global Scope vs Functional Scope - Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

Then down here at the bottom, you’ll notice I’m doing a block.

LoopBack Function Block example code - Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

Just four loops standing on its own. I am also redefining “age” as 0.

Now the question is what’s that going to affect? Is it going to affect the top Global Scope age? Or is it going to affect the Function Scope?

Let’s run it and let’s see.

We should get a three or so message boxes. You will see the first time it ran, global age was 55.

Showing Alert in Browser - Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

That’s what we would expect that would be correct. We’ll click “ok” and then, the internal one in the function, when it gets done looping, it was 5.

Showing Alert in Browser 2 - Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

I would expect that. But notice the last one, it should have written out 55. Instead, it wrote 5.

Scope in JavaScript Browser - Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

The reason is we over-load the value by doing “Var age” because there is no block level scope in JavaScript.

Var Age Example code - Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

Now, you’re going to see that it’s going to change in ECMAScript 6. There’s a new keyword they are going to introduce called, “Let,” and that will make the age scope only to the block.

Let LoopFunction Example - Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

ECMAScript 6 will help with some of the problems with the scoping. But, that’s not quite ready for prime-time yet. That’s another difference that you’ll need to know about is the scoping in JavaScript.

Another big difference in Functions can totally stand on their own in the JavaScript world. Whereas in C#, you have to put your methods inside of your Class.

C# code example of loopFunction - Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

Well functions in JavaScript are actually objects. This little function definition for a person, you can think of that as like a class. Normally, add under that class, a property called name and assign it to Jane Doe.

Now I can move up that person, just like its regular class.

Create Instance of Object - Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

That’s definitely unique compared to the C# type of approach because we are used to classes and you move up to the class.

Because we don’t have classes in JavaScript, you can substitute this function approach because functions are objects. There is a lot of interesting things you can do. This would just write out Jane Doe, if we are to run this one.

Inheritance

The last and big difference between C# and JavaScript is inheritance. Because we don’t have classes and inheritance like Java or C#, we have to use what’s built into the language, and it is called prototypal inheritance.

JavaScript Supports Prototypal Inheritance - Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

There is a prototype property that every object can hear it from the base object in JavaScript. You’ll notice in this case, we have an object called base.

Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

It is a blueprint, it is like our class, if you will. Then off base, I am going to go to the prototype, that’s inherited from an object in JavaScript. I am going to add a log function that just does an alert when it’s run.

Now, let’s say that I have a child that needs to inherit the functionality from base and what we really want to do is, when the child is run, we call log. What will happen is, it will first look at the child and ask, “Do you have a log function?” If you do, it will call him. If you don’t, it will then walk up the hierarchy which we are going to create in the next line of code and say “Do you have a log function?”

What we are going to do is to a have a child and we are going to assign to the child’s prototype, the new base.

New Base Code Example - Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

Really, that’s going to make the prototype of the base object available here to our child.

Function Alert Add code example - Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

After that, we are going to attach our own little add method. What is interesting here is, down in this code, when I call c.log after I move up the child, that’s going to look first in the child’s prototype and the local stuff and say “Do you have a log?”

Find New Log code- Learn JavaScript for C# Developers

It’s not going to find it. What it is going to do is, it’s going to walk up the prototype chain until it finds a prototype in a parent that has the log and then it would find this guy and then, it would run the function.

Unlike the “add” that you see in this example above, that actually would come in and just call the child’s add that’s on the child’s prototype itself.

 

Inheritance is totally different. This is one of the current ways that you can enable prototypal inheritance. ECMAScript 6 will be changing everything.

That’s a quick example of the few of the key differences and certainly there will be more I can cover, but that will get you thinking about how C# matches up.

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JavaScript for C# Developers – Key concepts of C# and JavaScript Syntax https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/javascript-for-c-developers-key-concepts-of-c-and-javascript-syntax/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/javascript-for-c-developers-key-concepts-of-c-and-javascript-syntax/#comments Fri, 08 May 2015 21:19:46 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=20454 This is an excerpt of a webinar by Dan Wahlin – JavaScript for C# Developers that was conducted at Interface Technical Training on September 14, 2014. You can watch the entire webinar at JavaScript for C# Developers webinar Dan Wahlin teaches Web Development and .NET Visual Studio classes at Interface Technical Dan’s instructor-led training includes … Continue reading JavaScript for C# Developers – Key concepts of C# and JavaScript Syntax

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This is an excerpt of a webinar by Dan Wahlin – JavaScript for C# Developers that was conducted at Interface Technical Training on September 14, 2014.

JavaScript Webinar link image of Dan Wahlin at Interface Technical Training

You can watch the entire webinar at JavaScript for C# Developers webinar

Dan Wahlin teaches Web Development and .NET Visual Studio classes at Interface Technical

Dan’s instructor-led training includes JavaScript, AngularJS, jQuery, Node.js, HTML5, ASP.NET MVC, C#, and C# design patterns. Dan’s classes can be attended in Phoenix, AZ or online with Remote Live.

Webinar Transcription:

What we’re going to do is go through some of the key concepts and knowledge that you can actually carry over from the C# world to JavaScript. The target audience for this particular post is people with a C# background. You certainly could use any object‑oriented background, but the demos I’ll show will all be C#‑based. If you’re trying to move more into JavaScript, you’ll actually benefit from this as well, but everything’s going to be .NET‑based.

In this post, we’ll look into Why you need to start learning JavaScript and we’ll compare C# and JavaScript Syntax.

In future posts, we’ll address the following:

We’re going to start off with why would you want to learn JavaScript in the first place. If you live on the server side, or you’re building desktop applications, or something along those lines, then, why take the time to learn this?

The answer there is “There are a lot of good reasons to do it, such as single‑page applications or validation, and much more that we’re going to talk about.”

Why you need to learn JavaScript

If you’ve been writing C# code for a while and then look at JavaScript like this:

Junkyard Mess Dan Wahlin Learning JavaScript Webinar

It looks like one big mess and is not the most pleasant language that you want to dive into. JavaScript feels really messy at first glance.

The good news is it’s not nearly that bad. It’s actually pretty nice to work with once you know some of the key aspects of the language and how it works.

With JavaScript, there are a few bumps along the way and I’ll point a few of them out later. JavaScript is actually very easy to get started with and you can do some really powerful things with it.

Why learn JavaScript in the first place? Really, it all boils down to if you’re building web applications and you want to do more on the client, then, this is a great way to go. JavaScript is the programming language of the Web. That’s not going to change anytime soon, whether you like it or don’t like it.

Client-side presentation images of why you need to learn JavaScript

I started with JavaScript when it was actually called “LiveScript” back in the early ’90s. As I kept working with JavaScript, a lot of people were thinking I’m crazy, because I liked this language. I’ve actually always liked JavaScript in general.

Today, JavaScript it’s very popular and there’s a lot you can do with it JavaScript also plays a critical role in our Web applications. As an example, you might want to do some client‑side validation.

Validate User Input on client-side learning Javascript for C#

Obviously, it’s nice to give the Client that type of instant feedback. You’ll of course have to validate on the Server-Side, as well, but this will give the client an instant feedback scenario.

Provide Client Sorting Filtering Paging learn JavaScript webinar

You might also want to do some filtering of data, paging and sorting on the Client-Side so it feels like a desktop application – JavaScript would enable this.

One of the big downfalls, I think, of the traditional Web applications is that every time you blink, it feels like, you’re doing a full‑page postback.

Eliminate full page postbacks with Ajax Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

With JavaScript, we can leverage AJAX and make asynchronous calls so that we can make more desktop‑like look and feel. It’s pretty snappy, you get the data very quickly. We’ll show an example later where it’s good on bandwidth and HTTP requests.

Build Single Page Applications SPA Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

I mentioned Single‑Page Applications (SPA), these are very popular today. Frameworks like AngularJS, or Ember.js, or Backbone, these are all JavaScript frameworks, or libraries that you can use to do some powerful processing.

Today, we’re really moving a lot of data from the server‑side load down to the client side. I recently got a Galaxy Note 3 with a quad‑core processor right on my phone. Why not let the phone do more of the heavy lifting and go that route?

Leverage Rich Libraries Frameworks Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

There’s a lot more you can do, as well you can leverage libraries. I mentioned jQuery which is another one that’s very popular. A lot of different things are JavaScript‑based. There’s much more we can talk about, but let’s do a demo of Server-side vs Client-side.

Demo intro slide Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

I’ll do a quick demo of a server‑side app versus a client‑side app. The first demonstration we’re going to look at is a pure ASP .NET app with C# on the back end. It has normal postbacks.

Postbacks in Visual Studio Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

We’ll open it and you can see it’s very basic, just has a drop‑down.

Standard full page postback Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

As you switch the drop‑down, it’s going to load some customers.

Brunswick Standard full page postback Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

We’ll go load all the customers in British Columbia. No big deal, right?

British Columbia full page postback Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

JavaScript can really help us out here in some scenarios, especially, if you have a lot of data. The problem is having to bring back this entire table, which is a lot of data, actually, depending on the size of your record.

We’ll look at it using Chrome Developer Tools, you can hit F12 or do command or control‑shift‑I.

Network Request Monitor Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

If We’re going to monitor the network requests. We can actually take a look at what is actually going back and forth over the wire.

Network Full Page Postback Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

We’ll select Alberta from the dropdown.

Alberta postback size Alberta-postback-size

It looks like the size of that was 11.3K for this customer ASPX. Let’s go look at Arizona, there’s more in Arizona it’s 13K.

Arizona size Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

Let’s do one more. Montana is about 13K.

Montana Size Standard Full page postback Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

You can see the size of the page actually coming back is fairly consistent but it depends on your data.

Now, let’s do the same app, but this particular app is using some JavaScript that you can see here.

JavaScript API Dataservice Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

This is using a little library called “KnockoutJS” to do data binding. It’s going to look the same, but let’s look at the actual data that’s sent back and forth.

KnockouJS data binding Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

Here’s the same type of app, but this is 100‑percent client‑side.

HTML API JSON data Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

The server just serves up the initial HTML and then we make an API call, specifically Web API. This returns JSON data. It does the same thing, but let’s take a look at the size of the data that’s coming back now.

I’m going to click on XHR, which will mean our XML HTTP request, in other words, AJAX calls.

XHR Ajax calls in JacaScript Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

Let’s run British Columbia.

It looks like that was 1.8K of data. Not bad.

JavaScript and Ajax British Columbia dropdown list Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

Let’s go to Montana again.

It looks like that was only 256 bytes. Not bad.

Montanna dropdown list Ajax Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

You can imagine if you’re designing your apps to run on a phone or a tablet or desktop, then this is a big deal.

Now, by leveraging AJAX, I’m able just to send the raw data that you can see here.

Raw data Ajax Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

Instead of having to send all the table tags and the TRs and the TDs back over to the client. That’s a quick look at one reason that you might consider JavaScript as you’re building your applications.

Similarities between JavaScript and C#

Now that you’ve seen the reason to learn JavaScript, let’s actually look at some the similarities between C# and JavaScript and how they relate.

Similarities Between JavaScript and C# Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

The good news is there are a lot of concepts that actually carry over if you already know C#. One of the things when you first learn C# or Java, or whatever your language is, is how to use the squiggly brackets {} and semicolons ;  They also exist in JavaScript as well.

Both languages have some very close concepts that you can transfer over almost directly. For instance, they both support objects. You can actually create a new instance of an object in C# and in JavaScript and work with it. You’re going to see a little later today that the way you do the objects is certainly different, but very similar concept there.

Variables are very similar in both JavaScript and C#. In fact, if you use the var keyword for dynamic inferred typing in C#, then, you can also use the var keyword in JavaScript. Very similar yet very different though on the data types, which we’ll show as well.

Both languages use functions. I think any language out there uses a lot of functions. That’s very common.

Finally, the conditional “if” statements, “switch” statements and “for loop” statements are practically identical in both languages. We’ll display those as well.

Demo image Comparing C# and JavaScript Syntax Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

In this demo I have some C# code in a class called “Similarities.cs.”

SimilaritiesCS in Microsoft Visaul Studio Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

I’ve broken down different parts of this. Variables.

Variable Visual Studio C# Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

We’re going to talk about some properties and some other features.

Let’s start with the one that’s open. In C#, we’re all used to doing something like prop tab tab to get a property definition. It looks like this.

Variables GetSet Microsoft Visual Studio Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

You have a Get and a Set.

With the current version of JavaScript…keep in mind there is a new version that’ll be coming out, but it’s not widely supported yet, in browsers.

The current version, that this.age = 0 would be a very similar definition to a property.

Variables JavaScript Syntax Variables-JavaScript-Syntax

It almost looks like a field it’s very similar.

You might wonder what the heck is this? It’s similar to C# however it changes context.

One thing to watch for in JavaScript, is that normally if you create a new Similarities here…we’ll call it “S”…and then you say, “S.age,” then, this would represent the Similarities, but the keyword “this” can change context.

Basically, whoever calls into “this” is what “this” is. Whereas in C#, it always represents the actual object itself. A little bit different but very similar as far as what you can define.

Let’s go to a simple variable.

Simple Variable Syntax Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

You’ll notice that we have a string, “Fred,” and then, we have a list of string called “names.” This is what it would look like in JavaScript.

Note that I could have just as easily, if it was in a function, put var. Of course, as a field, you don’t do that, in C#, but you’ll notice that it’s almost identical. You’ll see though that the typing is going to be quite a bit different with JavaScript, as we’ll talk about in a moment.

Arrays can actually be defined in different ways, in JavaScript, but arrays are similar in that you can add items into a collection, like a list of string. The way they work though is actually quite a bit different which we’ll look at as well.

Methods.

Methods Syntax Microsoft Visual Studio Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

We don’t officially call them “methods” in JavaScript. We call them “functions,” but it really doesn’t matter. A lot of people do say “It’s a method.” Basically, it’s a function that does something.

Here we have a C# method, called “GetName,” that returns a string.

C# GetName Syntax Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

This is the equivalent in JavaScript.

JavaScript Syntax Function GetName Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

You’ll notice it’s almost identical, aside from needing to input the “function” keyword.

You’ll note that there’s no return type. JavaScript doesn’t specify the type that’s returned from functions. That is a little bit different yet very similar and easy to get started with.

Arrays – Loops – Conditionals

Finally, Arrays, Loops, and Conditionals are also very similar. Here, we have a little field names.

034-Arrays-Loops-Conditionals-Syntax-learn-javascript

Pretty standard C# code, a bit contrived, but good for the demo.

We’re going to loop through. As we loop, if it equals zero (0), we’re going to add into the list up top, the list of string, first name. If it’s not zero (0), then, we’re going to add name, plus, whatever it is as we’re looping.

Let’s look at the JavaScript version. Again, very similar to C#.

Arrays Loops Conditionals JavaScript Version Learning JavaScript for C# Developers Webinar

We use the function. Notice that the for loop is identical, because we can use var in C# if we want, for type inference. The if is identical. As we move down, everything looks pretty good.

One of the big aspects we’ll talk about in the next section is that the conditionals in JavaScript are a little bit strange. This is the shark in the water that you’ve got to watch out for. We’ll address tge conditionals in the next post.

 

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The Value of Adding AngularJS to your Development Stack – with Dan Wahlin https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/value-adding-angularjs-development-stack-dan-wahlin/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/value-adding-angularjs-development-stack-dan-wahlin/#respond Fri, 12 Sep 2014 17:51:33 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=19125 AngularJS is one the hottest JavaScript group frameworks available today. Is it worth adding it to your development stack? That’s what we’re going to address in this video. AngularJS is one the hottest JavaScript group frameworks available today. Is it worth adding it to your development stack? That’s what we’re going to address in this … Continue reading The Value of Adding AngularJS to your Development Stack – with Dan Wahlin

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AngularJS is one the hottest JavaScript group frameworks available today. Is it worth adding it to your development stack? That’s what we’re going to address in this video.


AngularJS is one the hottest JavaScript group frameworks available today. Is it worth adding it to your development stack? That’s what we’re going to address in this video.

What’s so compelling about AngularJS anyway? First, it’s a client-side JavaScript framework with one core script. You won’t have to integrate a ton of third‑party scripts into your applications and then worry about whether or not those scripts are going to be compatible in the future. AngularJS is supported by a full‑time team at Google and has over 800 individual open-source contributors as well.

With AngularJS you can send and retrieve data from RESTful services, minimize code significantly by using data binding, provide a way to organize code and allow teams to work together more efficiently, switch between application screens quickly without reloading the entire page, create unit tests to ensure your code is working properly, validate data submitted by users, and, well, I could go on and on. It has a lot of great features baked into the framework.

For me, the power of AngularJS is that you can create snappy, single-page applications very quickly and they perform like they were built for the desktop. The code is flexible. It’s easy to deploy, update, and reuse. A great side benefit is the any app can be used on multiple devices.

Let’s talk about three key scenarios where AngularJS can be leveraged in the real world. Also discuss the AngularJS End-to-End SPA Development class at Interface Technical Training and how it can help you learn this powerful framework quickly and efficiently and at a professional level.

The scenarios that we’ll discuss include how to maximize productivity, write less code, and make your code more powerful and easier to maintain. How to migrate from existing technologies and allow apps to run on multiple devices and finally, how you can leverage AngularJS features to replace desktop applications with cross‑device web applications.

Let’s jump right into scenario one.

I was recently teaching a small team from a large global electronics manufacturer who is building an enterprise‑scale lab that was going to be used by a lot of people throughout the company. They had previously done most of their web development using jQuery and needed more of a framework for the new application.

JQuery is arguably the most popular client-side JavaScript library in existence and for good reason. I’ve used it for many years and I love it. I love what it does as far as making AJAX calls, manipulating the DOM, handling events, and of course you can animate objects.

For all its strengths it does have a few weaknesses. For example, if you have a form with 10 controls in it, say eight text boxes and two dropdowns, then with jQuery you’re looking at writing a minimum of 20 lines of code just to get data in and out of the controls. What if the IDs are CSS class name changes on your controls? You end up having to modify your JavaScript code to accommodate the name changes. That’s a little bit challenging.

I call this a control oriented approach since your code relies heavily on the IDs defined on the controls. You’re always interacting with the controls to get data into and out of them. With AngularJS you can take advantage of a newer and more modern development technique, I like to call the data oriented approach.

Using the data binding functionality built into Angular you can wire up property values to controls and when the property values change the controls change. Likewise, if the controls change, the property values change. It’s quite magical actually. Once the data binding is in place you can modify the styles of controls, change their visibility, change their values, and do much more by changing property values.

By using the data oriented approach you don’t care about the ID or the CSS class on the control any longer. In fact in many situations you won’t need to give your controls an ID. Imagine how much code you can cut from your web applications. To top it off jQuery plays nicely with AngularJS in case you want to leverage specific jQuery features.

I know many companies have used Adobe Flex and Microsoft Silverlight so that they can have a 100 percent control over the application, but still have the ability to deploy it through a browser. It’s no secret that both Flex and Silverlight are getting less emphasis nowadays, especially since they don’t run on all devices.

What’s the alternative? If you’re thinking about migrating from Adobe Flex or Microsoft Silverlight then AngularJS is a natural transition. You’ll actually be pleasantly surprised at how many concepts carryover such as data binding, a declarative syntax, animations, and much more.

Once you understand the core features provided by AngularJS you’ll be extremely productive in no time at all. Now keep in mind there are other alternatives out there such as Ember.js, Backbone, Durandal, et cetera. The good news is that many of the same concepts carryover. For me personally, I like AngularJS for all the reasons I’ve mentioned up to this point.

For the final scenario, I worked with an international financial company who has a large desktop application installed base. They want to simplify the process of deploying their apps due to the number of devices being used in the organization, especially since the desktop apps won’t run on all these devices.

Traditional applications weren’t a good fit for the web since every user action caused the entire page to reload. With AngularJS, however, you can build snappy single-page applications to feel much more like desktop applications, but they have the added benefit of being able to run on tablets, phones, and other devices that employees may be using.

Here’s the actual app that you’ll be building in the AngularJS End‑to‑End course at Interface Technical Training. You’ll actually put together all the pieces yourself. For instance, you’ll incorporate RESTful services and database interactions, AJAX calls from AngularJS to those services, and learn about all the great functionality provided by AngularJS on the client-side such as data binding, validation, factories and services, custom directives, controllers, scope and more.

The app that you’re building in class will perform much like a desktop application, but it’s going to be able to run on any device. The AngularJS End‑to‑End development course will provide you with all the skills needed to build single page applications, enhance productivity and code reuse, and provide that desktop‑like feel with a web deployment model.

You’ll be able to ask all the questions you want throughout class to ensure that you take away the best practices used by some of the biggest companies in the world as they build AngularJS applications.

There you have it, three real‑world examples where AngularJS can be used to streamline the development of web applications and a summary of interfaces in End‑to‑End class. You’ll actually build an app from start to finish and learn to leverage the power of AngularJS at a professional level.

Now, the course can be attended here in Phoenix, AZ or online using our amazing RemoteLive™ technology. Check out the course outline for more details and I hope to see you soon in class.

Dan Wahlin
Web Development Instructor
Interface Technical Training

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Interface is excited to announce a whole new way to look at Developer training. https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/interface-is-excited-to-announce-a-whole-new-way-to-look-at-developer-training/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/interface-is-excited-to-announce-a-whole-new-way-to-look-at-developer-training/#respond Mon, 14 Apr 2014 16:38:30 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=17285   The world that developers live in has been morphing over time. Changing technologies are a given, but changing jobs roles are often overlooked.   Introducing the new Developer program at Interface.  Web Developer focused on the server side? Check out our Open Server courses. WEB240: HTML, XHTML & CSS In-Depth Web Development Training Learn … Continue reading Interface is excited to announce a whole new way to look at Developer training.

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The world that developers live in has been morphing over time. Changing technologies are a given, but changing jobs roles are often overlooked.

 

Introducing the new Developer program at Interface. 


Web Developer focused on the server side? Check out our Open Server courses.

WEB240: HTML, XHTML & CSS In-Depth Web Development Training
Learn how to code web sites from the ground up using the best practices and web standards. This course includes many hands on labs which emphasize real world scenarios and challenges confronting web designers every day.

JS275: JavaScript Programming
The Web has changed a lot over the years as user interfaces have moved from displaying static data to more dynamic and flexible data. At the center of this change is JavaScript – one of the most popular scripting languages around.

HTML500: HTML5 and CSS3 Web Development
This new version of HTML provides developers with additional client-side power to enable them to build applications capable of running on desktops, laptops, tablets and mobile devices. Get up-to-speed on this amazing new version of the HTML language and its evolving importance in cutting-edge coding.

NODE300: Node.js/MEAN End-to-End Web Development
Node.js is one of the most revolutionary frameworks to come out in quite a while! Its asynchronous nature and flexibility makes it relevant for building everything from Web applications to client tools and you’ll find it being used in a variety of ways.


Find yourself developing on the client side? We have you covered with our Open Client classes.

WEB240: HTML, XHTML & CSS In-Depth Web Development Training
Learn how to code web sites from the ground up using the best practices and web standards. This course includes many hands on labs which emphasize real world scenarios and challenges confronting web designers every day.

JS275: JavaScript Programming
The Web has changed a lot over the years as user interfaces have moved from displaying static data to more dynamic and flexible data. At the center of this change is JavaScript – one of the most popular scripting languages around.

JS500: JavaScript and SPA Programming with jQuery, Knockout, AngularJS, Node.js and Grunt
Get up to speed on the latest JavaScript, data binding and SPA technologies. This course features a hands-on learning experience with expert instructor Dan Wahlin. Learn how to use Knockout, AgularJS, Node.js and Grunt to build dynamic Web applications.

JQRY300: Mastering jQuery
Learn how to use the jQuery scripting environment to boost productivity in Web Applications. You will learn how to use jQuery Plugins, create custom plugins, utilize client-side templates with Handlebars, mobile jQuery fundamentals and much more.

ANGJS300: AngularJS End-to-End SPA Development
The AngularJS End-to-End Application Development course provides a hands-on look at working with the AngularJS framework. Learn how to use the key features of AngularJS in single Page Application Features, define controllers, build re-useable data services with Factories and Services, build Custom Filters and HTTP interceptors in AngluarJS.

HTML500: HTML5 and CSS3 Web Development
This new version of HTML provides developers with additional client-side power to enable them to build applications capable of running on desktops, laptops, tablets and mobile devices. Get up-to-speed on this amazing new version of the HTML language and its evolving importance in cutting-edge coding.


If you are a Microsoft Web Developer we have built a course library that will train you on the fundamentals and the advanced topics to keep you on top of your career.

CS214: C#5 Programming with Visual Studio 2012
The C# Programming with Visual Studio course provides developers with the skills and knowledge they’ll need to succeed by providing an in-depth and hands-on analysis of different parts of the C# language. (MOC 20483)

CS314: Advanced C#5 Programming with Visual Studio 2012
Develop applications utilizing the latest .NET Framework and learn the core features of C#5 and Visual Studio 2012 technologies. Enhance your C# programming skills with this new advanced developer course.

CS410: C# Design and Application Patterns
Learn how to apply best practices to your C# development and .NET applications. This hand-on course uses real-life analogies that give developers the practical experience needed to succeed in their daily professions.

ASPMVC5: Microsoft ASP.NET MVC 5 Web Developer Training
Leap into ASP.NET MVC 5 using Visual Studio 2013. You will learn how to build web applications with the latest version of the Microsoft ASP.NET MVC 5 framework taught by author and instructor Stephen Walther. (MOC 20486)

JS275: JavaScript Programming
The Web has changed a lot over the years as user interfaces have moved from displaying static data to more dynamic and flexible data. At the center of this change is JavaScript – one of the most popular scripting languages around.

JQRY300: Mastering jQuery
This new version of HTML provides developers with additional client-side power to enable them to build applications capable of running on desktops, laptops, tablets and mobile devices. Get up-to-speed on this amazing new version of the HTML language and its evolving importance in cutting-edge coding.

HTML500: HTML5 and CSS3 Web Development
Learn how to apply best practices to your C# development and .NET applications. This hand-on course uses real-life analogies that give developers the practical experience needed to succeed in their daily professions.

DEV500: Building an HTML5 End-to-End Web Application with ASP.NET MVC 4, EF Code First and jQuery
Learn how to build HTML5 Web Applications End-to-End using Visual Studio 2012, ASP.NET, MVC4, Entity Framework Code First and jQuery in this 5-day advance Developer course taught by Microsoft MVP Dan Wahlin.


If you are a Microsoft Desktop/Device Developer we have kept our suite of C# courses.

CS214: C#5 Programming with Visual Studio 2012
The C# Programming with Visual Studio course provides developers with the skills and knowledge they’ll need to succeed by providing an in-depth and hands-on analysis of different parts of the C# language. (MOC 20483)

CS314: Advanced C#5 Programming with Visual Studio 2012
Develop applications utilizing the latest .NET Framework and learn the core features of C#5 and Visual Studio 2012 technologies. Enhance your C# programming skills with this new advanced developer course.

CS410: C# Design and Application Patterns
Learn how to apply best practices to your C# development and .NET applications. This hand-on course uses real-life analogies that give developers the practical experience needed to succeed in their daily professions.


For all the technologies we teach, please see our complete course schedule.

Classes at Interface can be attended from anywhere online with RemoteLive

If you need further assistance to sort it all out, our friendly representatives are always ready help. Give them a call at 602-266-8585 or email at info@interfacett.com

 

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Video – Getting Started with Java Programming https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/video-getting-started-with-java-programming/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/video-getting-started-with-java-programming/#respond Wed, 26 Feb 2014 18:25:35 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=16906 Video – Getting Started in Java Programming with Judy Lipinski In this Interface Video Blog, Java instructor Judy Lipinski discusses what developers will need to know before getting started developing with Java. Judy says that Java programming is a great programming language for beginners to learn. Java teaches students how to understand Object Oriented concepts. … Continue reading Video – Getting Started with Java Programming

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Video – Getting Started in Java Programming with Judy Lipinski


In this Interface Video Blog, Java instructor Judy Lipinski discusses what developers will need to know before getting started developing with Java.

Judy says that Java programming is a great programming language for beginners to learn. Java teaches students how to understand Object Oriented concepts. There is a great deal of flexibility with Java. For example, it can be designed on a Mac or PC and then deployed to a Linux Server without the need to change any of the Java code.

What’s the difference between Java and JavaScript?

JavaScript exists within the browser while Java is the Object Oriented language that can be uses in many environments such as desktop applications and on the sever side where we can connect to web services using Java. The programming of Java is similar to JavaScript but the syntax is different.

In this video, Judy also discusses topics relating to Java including:

Java Security vulnerabilities.

How Java is being used for Android App development and different areas of client side and enterprise applications using Java Servlets. Java has been around for a while and is one of the early tools that allow different environments to communicate. Java is open source so you’re not locked in to using only one vendor.

You can get started in Java simply using a text editor but tools that simplify the process are Eclipse, IntellijIDEA and NetBeans. These tools are free and once someone learns one tool, it’s rather simple to use the other options.

Judy also discusses what the numerous acronyms associated with Java include JDK, SDK, JRE and JVM mean. How similar or different is Java from C# programming and what the Java Enterprise Edition (Java EE) is.

Finally, Judy discuses what students should already know before attending Java training?

Judy Lipinski teaches JAVA200: Java Programming – An In-Depth Introduction at Interface Technical Training in Phoenix, AZ. This class can be attended from anyher online with RemoteLive™.

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Video – Getting Started with Android App Development with Judy Lipinski https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/video-getting-started-with-android-app-development-with-judy-lipinski/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/video-getting-started-with-android-app-development-with-judy-lipinski/#respond Fri, 07 Feb 2014 16:54:48 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=16756 Video – Getting Started with Andriod Development with Judy Lipinski Getting Started with Android App Development In this Interface Video Blog, Mobile App Development instructor Judy Lipinski discuses what developers will need to know before getting started developing with Android. The first requirement is that developers working in Android need to be able to program … Continue reading Video – Getting Started with Android App Development with Judy Lipinski

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Video – Getting Started with Andriod Development with Judy Lipinski

Getting Started with Android App Development

In this Interface Video Blog, Mobile App Development instructor Judy Lipinski discuses what developers will need to know before getting started developing with Android.

The first requirement is that developers working in Android need to be able to program in Java. When developing Android apps there are tools available such as Eclipse and the Android Developer kit into Dalvik code.

Fortunately, most Android Development code is open source so there’s really no initial cost to get started in programming Android Apps. The only cost is when you’re making your apps available on Google Play. There is a $25 registration fee and selling apps on Google Play costs 30% of the application cost.

There are numerous versions of SDK Releases. It’s important for Developers to know what limitations may exist in previous SDK versions. This is where tools such as Eclipse are helpful for Developers to determine what functions and features are available in prior releases. If an App isn’t available on previous SDK releases, some devices will not have the app available in the Google Play Store.

When developing apps for iOS, there is a more stringent structure. When developing apps for Android, it’s much more “free-form”. It’s easier for developers to upload their apps into Google Play. Then it’s up to user ratings to determine whether the app is good or not.

Fortunately, Android Developers do not need to purchase all the numerous devices that are running Android. Eclipse gives developers the ability to build apps for virtually all of the Android enabled devices in the marketplace.

In this video, Judy also discusses the benefits and challenges of Android vs iOS, data storage requirements including Web Services, SQL, XML and JSON.

Judy Lipinski teaches ANDRD300: Getting Started with Android Programming at Interface Technical Training in Phoenix, AZ.

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Video – Getting Started with iOS Development with Judy Lipinski https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/video-getting-started-with-ios-development-with-judy-lipinski/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/video-getting-started-with-ios-development-with-judy-lipinski/#respond Fri, 31 Jan 2014 17:56:44 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=16693 Video – Getting Started with iOS with Judy Lipinski Getting Started with iOS In this Interface Video Blog, Mobile App Development instructor Judy Lipinski discuses what developers will need to know before becoming a developer in iOS. Developers will need to have a basic understanding of programming such as for Loop and variables but learning … Continue reading Video – Getting Started with iOS Development with Judy Lipinski

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Video – Getting Started with iOS with Judy Lipinski

Getting Started with iOS

In this Interface Video Blog, Mobile App Development instructor Judy Lipinski discuses what developers will need to know before becoming a developer in iOS.

Developers will need to have a basic understanding of programming such as for Loop and variables but learning and understanding Objective C language is the most important tool developers will need for programming in iOS.

One of the biggest challenges for developers venturing into the iOS platform is that they are already developers in another language and programming in Objective C has it’s differences. But understanding the fundamental differences in the Objective C structure and Xcode will help the developer to bring applications to the marketplace.

Judy also discusses what costs and revenue sharing is involved to become an iOS Developer.

Judy Lipinski teaches IOS300: Introduction to iPhone and iPad Application Development using iOS6 and Xcode 4.5 at Interface Technical Training in Phoenix, AZ.

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This Week at Interface | January 28, 2014 https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/this-week-at-interface-january-28-2014/ https://www.interfacett.com/blogs/this-week-at-interface-january-28-2014/#respond Tue, 28 Jan 2014 18:05:09 +0000 http://www.interfacett.com/blogs/?p=?p=16687 Here’s what’s happening this week at Interface. Ralph and Lynn are up to their usual hijinks while they take a look at the Remote Live classes running this week here at Interface Technical Training. WEB240: HTML, XHTML & CSS In-Depth Web Development Training with Spike Xavier CS214: C#5 Programming with Visual Studio 2012 with Dan … Continue reading This Week at Interface | January 28, 2014

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Here’s what’s happening this week at Interface.

Ralph and Lynn are up to their usual hijinks while they take a look at the Remote Live classes running this week here at Interface Technical Training.

WEB240: HTML, XHTML & CSS In-Depth Web Development Training with Spike Xavier

CS214: C#5 Programming with Visual Studio 2012 with Dan Wahlin

BI779: SQL Server 2012 Reporting Services (SSRS) for Report Developers with Peter Avila

For our full course schedule, head to http://www.interfacett.com/schedule

And our video library can be found at http://videotraining.interfacett.com/

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