Configuring Internet Restrictions with Internet Communications Management with Group Policy

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Configuring Internet Restrictions with Internet Communications Management with Group Policy

3 1 Rick Trader
Added by May 3, 2016

Within Group Policy an administrator can restrict what traffic is allowed to access the Internet from within the corporate network. These restrictions can be configured at both the computer and user nodes in Group Policy. These setting are located for the computer at Computer Configuration\Policies\Administrative Templates\System\Internet Communications Management (See Figure 1) and User Configuration\Policies\Administrative Templates\System\Internet Communications Management (See Figure 2).

001-Configuring-Internet-Restrictions-Group Policy

Figure 1.

002-Configuring-Internet-Restrictions-Group Policy-Manager

Figure 2.

Within either configuration you enable Restrict Internet communications you will restrict all Internet Communication within the Internet Communication setting node.

003-Configuring-Internet-Restrictions-Group Policy-Manager-Editor

If you desire to control Internet communications individually you can use the Internet Communication setting node (Shown below) to configure each.

004-Configuring-Internet-Restrictions-Group Policy-Manager-Editor

Computer configuration

005-Configuring-Internet-Restrictions-Group Policy-Manager-Editor

User configuration

Before configuring restrictions to specific Internet based traffic thoroughly test to ensure the desire traffic is being restricted and allowed traffic is not being restricted.

As you can see there numerous setting to basically control all communications between corporate computers and the Internet.

For more information and an explanation of each setting go to Group Policy Settings Listed Under the Internet Communication Management Category in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2

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Until next time – Ride Safe!

Rick Trader
Windows Server Instructor – Interface Technical Training
Phoenix, AZ

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