Configuring Network Connectivity Status Indicator (NCSI) with Group Policy

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Configuring Network Connectivity Status Indicator (NCSI) with Group Policy

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Added by May 4, 2016

Network Connectivity Status Indicator (NCSI) is a feature within the Network Awareness feature to indicate whether or not your computer has Internet connectivity. There may be situations with in your corporate network (Isolated network) that you may need to configure NCSI to look for a local network resource instead of an Internet resource to satisfy the NCSI feature tests.

There are 6 different setting that can be configured through GPOs to control the location NCSI is using to determine Internet connectivity. These setting are located in the following path:  Computer Configuration\Policies\Administrative Templates\Network\Network Connectivity Status Indicator.

001-Configuring-Network-Connectivity-Status-Indicator-NCSI-Group-Policy

The 6 possible setting are in the following figures. The help files located in the configuration interface fully explains each setting.

  1. Specify corporate DNS probe host address.

002-DNS-probe-NCSI-Group-Policy

  1. Specify corporate DNS probe host name

003-DNS-probe-host-name-NCSI-Group-Policy

  1. Specify corporate site prefix

004-Configuring-Network-Connectivity-Status-Indicator-NCSI-Group-Policy

  1. Specify corporate Website probe URL

005-Configuring-Network-Connectivity-Status-Indicator-NCSI-Group-Policy

  1. Specify domain location determination URL

006-Configuring-Network-Connectivity-Status-Indicator-NCSI-Group-Policy

  1. Specify passive polling

007-Configuring-Network-Connectivity-Status-Indicator-NCSI-Group-Policy

For more information see:

Why Does My Network Icon Have an Exclamation Mark?

How to Disable Network Connectivity Status Indicator (NCSI) with Group Policy

Configuring Internet Restrictions with Internet Communications Management with Group Policy

Until next time – Ride Safe!

Rick Trader
Windows Server Instructor – Interface Technical Training
Phoenix, AZ

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